Posts Tagged ‘Wonder Woman’

Wonder Woman Movie Poster Diana leaves her paradise Island magically hidden from the rest of the world to fight alongside men in a war to end all wars.

Directed by Patty Jenkins, Wonder Woman is a pleasing film in a sea of other superhero flicks. What it gets right is a good mix of action and narrative helped by the back drop of The Great War/World War I. While arguably it lags in the final act, mainly due to the seeming obligatory big boss final battle showdown it for the most part swiftly moves along. Part new origin story on the island of Themyscira, home to the Amazons, you see the character honing her powers and becoming Wonder Woman. Later when she helps a spy (Chris Pine) and they journey to Europe circa 1913, she’s finds that she is a fish out of water in her new surroundings in searching for the God of War.

Allan Heinberg’s screenplay has a few twists and plays with the sexiest elements of the period. Nevertheless, it slightly sells itself out at times with all the tropes of a love story with at times Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman playing second fiddle to Pine’s American spy pilot. Thankfully these are few and far between, but it’s still an unnecessary dynamic.

There’s a top cast full of familiar faces including David Thewlis, Connie Nielsen and Robin Wright with the sets and costumes being Oscar worthy. This incarnation supersedes Wonder Woman 1967’s pilot, Lynda Carter’s TV pop icon version complete with memorable theme and Adrianne Palicki’s failed pilot. Gadot may not be everyone’s idea of what Diana Prince/Wonder Woman should look like, however, she is great in the role carrying the naive innocence having been on a hidden island almost all of her life with the power and presence that we saw glimpses of in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016). There’s also some present day scenes that fit nicely with Zack Snyder’s outing and Justice League (2017). With plenty fight scenes the new Hans Zimmer & Junkie XL Wonder Woman theme kicks in fittingly and Rupert Gregson-Williams’ score captures the atmosphere of the respective settings.

Overall, Wonder Woman is probably one of the most rounded entertaining super hero movies out there with its war themes ironically just as relevant today.

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Rather than start 2012 on a horror note I thought I’d keep things light with my thoughts on Wonder Woman’s doomed TV outing that I was lucky enough to view – certainly from a visual perspective… No matter what I’ll always have the 70’s theme:

Wonder Woman, Wonder Woman.
All the world’s waiting for you,
and the power you possess… Sorry, here is my low down on the 2011 pilot…

Wonder Woman must stop the head of a pharmaceutical company’s illegal experiments for financial gain.

Opening with the horror-stricken images of a boy with bleeding eyes, Wonder Woman quickly moves to a foot chase though the streets. There’s no origin story which some have highly criticised. Personally I’m a exasperated with origin stories, these superhero characters have become a part of pop culture and a back story can seem somewhat unnecessary.

The pilot establishes Wonder Woman as a known face in the real world, a vigilant of sorts, with a reputation for knocking down doors, invading privacy, assaulting people and the videos uploaded to YouTube.

Adrianne Palicki is surprising good as Diana Prince / Wonder Woman, and oddly the promotional pictures for the show didn’t do her justice. She’s tough, rough, sexy and sulky. The plot features a standard Cary Elwes performance as her marketing CEO and Elizabeth Hurley plays the antagonist head of a pharmaceutical company.

It’s quite amusing that (in the world of the pilot) she has become marketable merchandise property and makes a remark that the comic version of her is incorrect with Diana stating that the Wonder Woman doll is insulting and she want’s it redesigned. “These breast are ridiculous.” “Wonder Woman isn’t vulgar.” “Wonder Woman is perfect, perfect t*ts, perfect ass, perfect teeth.” It is apparent that Diana’s/Wonder’s crime fighting technology is funded by Wonder Woman’s merchandising success which is an interesting titbit (no pun intended).

There’s establishing flashback for Diana’s love interest and some good camera work and effects from director Jeffrey Reiner, the contemporary music is dramatic and adds to the tension in the dialogue scenes. David E. Kelley’s story explores briefly the problem of superheroes heavy handiness being unlawful and forever under legal scrutiny.

Wonder Woman is reminiscent of ‘The New Adventures of Superman’ (1993- 1997) although it does have a darker tone and sleeker look. It moves away from Superman’s studio feel and while not particularly true to the comic, Wonder Woman’s shot on location look and Kelley relevant poignant dialogue adds to its allure as much as Palicki’s costume.

The only big action scene is at the 30 minute mark and is the highlight of the pilot with Palicki’s physical prowess and wire-work being most impressive.

Overall, Adrianne Palicki equals Lynda Carter’s incarnation and while not spectacular or highly engrossing it’s no lesser than other mediocre TV productions that have been given a chance and a longer run.
It may have evolved and brought a live action Wonder Woman to another generation but I suppose we may never know –  that is until some else has a stab at bringing DC’s female flag character to life.