Posts Tagged ‘film news’

Spiderhole Poster Movie (11 x 17 Inches - 28cm x 44cm)As a self-confessed horror fan I took sometime out from writing when I was asked to take a look at Daniel Simpon’s horror offering Spiderhole just released on DVD. The usual press kit arrived and while tantalising I wasn’t sure what to expect…
Four London Art Students squat in a derelict house to save money with the intention to live-free in a meaningful, creative and partying student lifestyle environment. However, they find themselves trapped inside a large house and their unlawful entry may come at a price, possibly their lives.
Daniel Simpson’s director / writer feature film debut is an exciting offering of a well-crafted film with an effective and expensive looking production design. The lighting is excellent, creating a dark and ominous atmosphere in the confinement of the empty building. He throws in enough camera angles, movement and cuts though-out to prevent events ever becoming static.

Spiderhole begins customary enough with a carefree student Molly having a check-up at the doctors on a sunny London’s day, but once she meets her three friends to go on a squatting adventure of free spirited living things take a turn for the worse and it becomes a claustrophobic nightmare.

 

Simpson sets-up the perfect intro for a haunted house thriller, shadowy corridors, locked doors, complete with bangs and bumps. You almost feel you’re in for a rework of 1962 The Haunting. Nevertheless, as the supernatural element is dispensed with and the ‘torture porn’ element begins with plenty of blood, mind-games and grime to get Saw-esque fans jumping in their seats. Executed with some excellent practical and realistic looking effects and blood.
Although the characters are thrust  into the horror very quickly the Brit slang dialogue is naturalistic enough to keep the tension on track. George Maguire’s performance as the edgy sculpture lover is notable and Molly character is written logically and cleverer than most heroines of this genre and is wonderfully played by Emma Griffiths Malin. Both Amy Noble and Reuben-Henry Biggs are more than adequate in the supporting roles and a nod goes to John Regan’s subtle performance as The Captor.
Jason Cooper and Oliver Krauss score and the sound design is pounding, nauseating which fittingly adds to the on screen action, touching nerves and senses, evocative of the feelings stirred by Marco Beltrami and Marilyn Manson’s RE (2002) score.
Some plot and style elements are reminiscent of Creep, The Collector, Severance, REC, Catacombs, Hostel and Saw 2 to name a few, however, there’s enough originality, mystery, twists and a surprise ending to satisfy the casual horror viewer. Overall, if you enjoy blood, torture and captivity Spiderhole is made for you.

Spiderhole Official Website

 

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Alyssa Milano Poster Lavender Lingerie
What have Underworld, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Van Helsing got in common? No not girl power. Answer: Heroines.Where does Lucia Ferrara fit in this feisty bunch amongst a love struck teenager similar to Twilight’s Bella Swan? Kick-ass characters like Buffy, Selene and Anna Valerious. A damsel in distress, Wilhelmina “Mina” Harker as in the tradition of Bram Stoker’s Dracula novel. Lucia is like none of the above…
Kristen Stewart 11X17 Poster Banner Photo - Smokin Hot! New! #05What she has got in common is that she’s a fictional character, a heroine who finds herself in an extraordinary and dangerous situations faced with deadly choices. She’s an everyday woman, just like you. No super powers, no desire to become a vampire, no longing to marry Jonathan Harker. She pouts and snorts when she laughs. Her problems are balancing her work, health, friends, relationships, men and family.

Trading in Zumba, aerobics classes every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday for something a little tougher like Kalaripayat or sparing sessions, she likes to keep herself in shape. Despite being beautiful, with the looks of her mother (who she tragically lost to cancer) and celebrities Alyssa Milano and Mila Kunis, she still feels self-conscience and insecure about herself.

Lucia Grace Ferrara went to a public school and then Goldsmith University, London picking up a BA (Hons) in English and American Literature. After the death of her father she has only his friend and her godfather Robert Morgan to look out for her and her boyfriend Max to rely on. However, this is her greatest flaw thinking she needs a man in her life to make her feel strong,(a replacement for her deceased father?).

That said, her life changes when Max makes a find that puts him on the cover of  the tabloids and she gets an unwanted slice of fame. She meets a captivating, woman named Iliana in a museum and soon Lucia is drawn into a world of mystery and deception. It’s it not long after this ‘chance’ encounter that she is implicated in a murder and has Adrian Michaels a D.I contacting her to be questioned. Little does she know that a frozen body her mountaineering boyfriend has discovered is linked to this enigmatic woman and she instinctively knows that something is not quite right.

Encounters at the museums, several invitations, a masque ball, an outdoor music show and lavish dinners entwined with death, mutation and infatuation and she finds herself in a web of deceit within a rabbit hole.And her life is turned upside down when she meets a man named Stellan.

Lucia is given an old book which gives her an insight to who’s body has been found and who this woman may really be. Soon she finds herself questioning her sanity and decisions as these strangers offer so much and ask for so little. Before long she is forced to go head to head with Iliana, her sisters and even Stellan. It increasing becomes difficult to remove herself from the dreamlike, perilous, situations and locations she finds herself in.

There are endless actresses that would make the perfect Lucia Ferrara, personally I like the idea of Jaime Murray, but casting direction was never my forté,  who would you chose?

Are there any elements of  Bella, Selene or Mina in Lucia, that’s for the reader of Blood Hunger to decide. One thing is for sure, Lucia maybe the most unlikely of characters to have ever faced and uncovered real evil…
Blood Hunger cover

Blood Hunger is out now.

Audiobook on iTunes
“One thing is for sure you’ll never get to the centre of the Labyrinth.” Fiction, don’t you love it? Against all odds to out thwart some kind of evil. Well that’s where Blood Hunger the film is right now. Stuck in the pages of a novel, dying to get out and see the light of day onto celluloid or digital film.
From the outset, Blood Hunger may never happen but while I’m still here blogging, writing books and making films, there’s a chance. And like any film project it’s slim but workable. Nevertheless, even with the greatest writers on board or with he greatest actors interested to play the parts, it still doesn’t mean it’ll be made.
With all film making it’s about finance, and even if you have it, and a great producer, without distribution, no one will get to see it.
I’ll keep you up dated. So while I’m working on the above it’s safe to say it’s in development, in the meantime here is the trailer to the book (below) which features clips the spin off film Terminus and the Blood Hunger photo shoot.
Enjoy…
Blood Hunger Trailer
Read Dread Central’s write up of Blood Hunger here
Exclusive to the USA, download the Terminus film here
Christopher Smith, (born 1970) is not just a British film director but also a great writer, while not celebrated as the likes of the comparable Neil Marshall or the now mainstream Christopher  Nolan, Smith certainly deserves his place in directing Brit history. Here’s my lowdown on his fabulous quad of films 2004 -2010…
Creep (2004)
Franka Potente is party goer Kate, after she misses her last train, she is pursued by a deformed crazy and has to fight for survival in the London underground system.
British films had played it safe for a jolly good while with costume dramas, romantic comedies and gangster flicks. However, the UK have started dishing out a few original horror gems in recent years, Dog Soldiers, Descent etc. Writer/ director Christopher Smith (who went on to make Severance) with a small budget gives the viewer an effective, interesting chiller.
There’s no bad acting here, the actors deliver the goods with a limited dialogue driven script. To build up the tension Smith utilises the underground, music and sound to full effect. He creates a genuine creepy atmosphere, the lighting is fantastic and the gore effects are note worthy.
The quirky small cast that Potente encounters are believable and the killer who dwells in the underground is one of the better original killers in a longer while.
The film is very bloody at times and was quite shocking in 2004. Creep remains a strong claustrophobic and underrated horror.
 
Severance (2006)
 
Imagine your on an office bonding weekend with your boss and colleagues, with all the typical office banter and goings on but you then get stuck in the middle of nowhere and your colleagues start to get killed off- this is the basic premise to the highly recommended film Severance.
Severance is laced with genuine humour, mostly supplied by Steve played by Danny Dyer and Tim McInnerny as clueless office boss Richard. The supporting cast give memorable and plausible performances that highlight underlying relationships making the characters likable. The character build up pays off as you find yourself rooting for their survival. The bad guys are menacing and there is plenty of realistic gore.
This very enjoyable, ironic, balanced, horror/comedy written and directed by Christopher Smith remains witty and shocking throughout.
Highly recommended whether you work in an office or not.
 
 
 
Triangle (2009)
Written and directed by Christopher Smith, lead Melissa George gives a
justifiably odd but mesmerising performance as Jess, as her and her
friends are forced to abandon their sailing boat and take refugee on an
ocean liner.
Some may find the story frustrating, however, it’s a taught mind-bending thriller, about how your actions can change your life.
Triangle is an interesting grounded and emotionally driven chiller that explores time travel, doppelgangers and choices.
George effortlessly carries the weight of the film on her shoulders and the small supporting cast are more than effective. Smith’s direction is superb, with few locations, as the film mostly takes place on the marvellously dressed ‘Ghost ship’, his angles and use of movement ensure the viewer is never left uninterested and credit must go to Robert Humphreys’ photography direction. Stuart Gazzard’s editing is fantastic and key in making the interloped story work. Christian Henson’s score is the icing on the cake and adds to the eerie, creepy atmosphere.
Triangle gives the viewer a lot to think about and ponder over well
after the credits roll.
Black Death (2010)
Two British directors and writers really standout for me in recent years, Neil Marshall (Dog Soldiers, Descent and Doomsday) and Christopher Smith (Creep, Triangle and Severance). Smith’s latest offering has it the mark with a blend of swords, Catholicism and Wicker released the same year Neil Marshall’s well advertised Centurion, which on first viewing was sadly average.

Set in 1348 the Black Death is at it peak, however, one village appears to be immune to the plague. Ulric (Sean Bean) devoted Christian enlist the help of a Monk (Eddie Redmayne) to lead him and his men through dangerous lands to this unholy village where it is said the dead are being brought back to life.

With marshes, fog and mists across the lands it oozes atmosphere. The gritty realistic sets and settings are note worthy, everything looks authentic and aged, perfect for first outbreak of bubonic plague. There’s some great practical effects, cadavers, dismemberment’s and blood. The flights are finely choreographed and swordplay is raw and relentless as limbs are hacked off.

The latter part of the film slows down, building tension in the seemingly safe village, Smith’s develops the eerie strangeness of the rural superbly, reminiscent of the Wickerman (1973 & 2006), In the Name of the Rose (1986) and The Village (2004).

Although in fear of being typecast as another chain armoured soldier Bean gives a passionate and gripping performance, and newcomer Redmayne plays the confounded monk Osmund’s admirably. The supporting cast, even though another band mercenaries are memorable and the characters are developed. Comedy actor Tim McInnerny is satisfactory in an unusual serious role as the village head. There’s a notable cameo by David Warner as The Abbot. However, it’s Carice van Houten who steals the show as Langiva the striking necromancer.

There’s a little too much shaky hand held camera work at times, that aside the cinematography is first rate. Dario Poloni screenplay is the icing on the cake, as the dialogue feels authentic and unforced, compared to the aforementioned other period piece. It explores religious beliefs, faith, witch hunts, occultism and much more.

With low expectation’s for another period piece, I was pleasantly surprised by Smith’s vision. Certainly not perfect or the grandest film; however, it’s a gripping medieval, satanic mystery action that has a nice original twist at the end.

Anyone that has listened my interviews over the years will know that I’m a fan of Hammer Horror films, but if I may add it’s in the oddest sense, they are not the greatest productions ever made but they have a Gothic, eerie, charm of their own with some fine performances, setting, sets, theatrical scores and things that go bump in the night.
I discussed this with the outlandish Scream Queen Ingrid Pitt, it became all to clear to me, having children of my own that Universal classics like ‘Dracula’, ‘The Wolfman’ and ‘Frankenstein’ may never be seen not just by British youngsters but US and  the rest of worlds teens. That is unless they have some kind of horror influence in their lives and find stories, books , posters, of this genre of films intriguing to find out more.  Young people haven’t or don’t get the opportunity to see the older horror movies or Hammer films that inspired me and others like The Reptile (1966), The Gorgon (1964) and Plague of the Zombies (1966) to others such as From Beyond the Grave, Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors and The House That Dripped Blood. So when I heard about @cyberschizoid’s campaign (on Twitter) to bring back classic horror to BBC 2,  I had to do my bit in joining in by telling you about my fantasy horror double bill.
Now while I could tell you about an array of UK productions from The Ghoul (1933) to Vampire Lovers(1970) and likes of 1957’s The Curse of Frankenstein. Personally I’d love to see Dead People (1974) or Let’s Scare Jessica to Death (1971) on the BBC 2 but I’ve chosen titles a possibly less obvious to most and not British. I believe they would make great first viewing and have the drawing power to intrigue, inspire and capture the imagination of new comers of the genre.  So in true tradition of those BBC 2 days gone by here are my thoughts on an oldie black and white, followed by a colour film just like they were aired way back when…
BBC take note, I’d be happy to sit in a large leather chair in front of a log fire, in a drawing room and introduce these… And I’m a lot cheaper than Terry Wogan or Jonathan Ross. So turn that tuner, wait for the TV to heat up, this is my horror double bill…
Okay first up is Carnival of Souls (1962) and not a surprise to old school fans. A true horror classic Director Herk Harvey and writer John Clifford both waived their earnings in order to get the film made. Upon release in 1962 the film was a failure in the box office, thankfully its subsequent airings on late night television helped to gain it a strong cult following so Clifford and Herks work was not all in vain.
The delightful Candace Hilligoss is perfectly cast as the troubled woman that after surviving a traumatic car accident, that kills her two friends, becomes haunted by a frightening ghoul and drawn to a mysterious abandoned carnival. It’s a shame that Hilligoss only acted in two features as she gives an impressive performance as Mary Henry.
The music is very creepy and a little too intrusive in places, however, for it’s time and budget it is a well crafted film. Carnival of Souls many not be as sleek and stylish as the Haunting (1963) but it is far more eerie. The zombies are not as imposing as in Night of the Living Dead, however, they are vastly creepier and macabre.
Oozing atmosphere it’s a creative and unnerving film that concludes with a common place twist but back in ’62 it was ahead of it’s time, a true cult classic.
And onto the next…
Non si deve profanare il sonno dei morti”  (original title) I know its Spanish/ Italian production but it’s set in England and feel very Brit.A crop dusting machine from the agricultural pest-control is emitting ultra-sonic waves that are re-animating corpses… 


A lot have said this is underrated, granted it’s overlooked. It is Atmospheric with an ominous feel. It has great locations and is at times genuinely creepy. However, it’s shares more with Fulci than Romero. The acting is not aided by the bad dubbing. To its credit it has an eerie musical score by Giuliano Sorgini and a number of suspenseful sequences but it borrows many of its best sequences from Night of the Living Dead. 


I watched director Jorge Grau’s offering under the title of ‘Let Sleeping Corpse Lie’ but whichever name you see the film under don’t be mistaken or mislead, it’s a solid zombie horror movie and of its time with fine cinematography from Francisco Sempere. It’s a lot better than the low budget DTV zombie films that there’s no shortage of at the moment.

For more information about the campaign visit cyberschizoid blog

and check out fellow supporter Amanda Norman’s blog

Planet of the Apes (1968) is without a doubt a milestone in novel adaptations and science fiction. As a series they touched on social unrest, evolution and the possibilities of space and time travel.

Four sequels followed Franklin J. Schaffner apes: Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970); Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971); Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972); Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973)followed apes quickly in secession and while the sequels were inciting the quality never did matched the original.

The TV series followed with Planet of the Apes (1974) and the animated Return to the Planet of the Apes(1975). The hastely speed in which they were made and released in amongst a toy spree (before the infamous Star Wars (1977) merchandising) is what probably lead to it’s downfall, in a way they slaughted the cash-cow and golden goose within 6 years.

In 2001 Tim Burtons reimagining was released and ten years later Rise of the Planet of the Apes, an original origin film that pays homage to the original 1968 film was released.

Below are my comments on the 1968 original, the 2001 reimagined version and 2011’s Rise…

Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011)

In a personal bid to help his father’s medical condition a man’s experiments for a genetic engineering company leads to the dangerous development of an intelligence in apes.
Although it departs in many ways from the original films, it is a fantastic piece of entertainment in its own right. Rise of the Planet of The Apes mixes the right amount of character development with story, effects and performances capturing the imagination of a new generation.
Despite a good cast with great performances notably from John Lithgow and James Franco, it’s the apes themselves and Andy Serkis coupled with
some state of the art special effects that steal the show. 
Amanda Silver and Rick Jaffa’s writing keeps the action and emotion somewhat believable, that Franco handles particularly well. The contemporary setting of San Francisco gives the film a familiar believable feel and it is a good contrast to the dark caged scenes and sterile lab sets. Patrick Doyle’s score compliments the action and stirs feelings during the poignant moments.
Rupert Wyatt’s direction ensures there’s enough surprises and action setups to give Rise momentum. Wyatt’s handling of Caesar manages to demand attention throughout with a welcomed display of edginess, danger and intelligence. There’s also an added odd eeriness due to the ape actions and glancing looks. In addition, the writers and Wyatt thoughtfully give enough nods to the original to humble fans and hints at possible sequels throughout to tease further interest.  
Overall, Rise manages to be an emotional ride, successfully grounding the concept of the originals while eradicating Burton’s 2001 missed opportunity. Caesar is home…

Planet of the Apes (1968)

Franklin J. Schaffner is never given enough credit when it comes to the genuine sci-fi classic Planet of the Apes. The talking points are usually the twist ending, or the late great Charlton Heston and Roddy McDowall.

A philosophical sci-fi made in 1968 and nominated for two Oscars it still holds up today as a social parable, effective drama with a relevant and underlining social commentary. It’s the primitive depiction of an ape civilisation rather than technologically society made Planet of the Apes standout as the iconic film it is haled as today.

‘Apes builds up nicely, there’s a wonderful score, (groundbreaking for the time) by Jerry Goldsmith, creating eerie and ominous atmosphere with the first exciting ape reveal at about 30 minutes in.

The film is wonderfully directed and has a solicitous and thought proving screenplay by Michael Wilson & Rod Serling. That said source material was from Pierre Boulle’s very wry, whimsical and thoughtful novel. Astoundingly Boulle is also author of The Bridge over the River Kwai.

The few visual effects are sufficient but the ape make up is admirable and star of the show. Recognisable only by their voices Kim Hunter as human conservationist Dr. Zira and the anxious Cornelius played by McDowall are splendidly magnificent as they assist Taylor played by the boldly cast film legend Heston to escape the command of the apes. The attractive Linda Harrison, who plays Nova is effective and the British classical actor, in orangutan make-up Maurice Evans is outstanding, giving a weight of believability to the subject matter.

Planet of the Apes is an original science fiction must see.

Planet of the Apes (2001)

Remake, re-imagination whatever you’d like to label it as, Planet of the Apes (2001) is inferior to the original 1968 film in almost every way.

That said, the make up is excellent, Tim Roth as Thade is fantastic, Colleen Atwood costumes are notable and Danny Elfman’s thumping score is an achievement. The spaceship sets and on the location night scenes have a unique atmosphere and edge about them. Even Mark Wahlberg tries his best to handle the half-baked script and there are a few welcomed cameos from some of the original cast.

On the flip side there’s some choppy editing, an uneven story, the ape city and the sandy finale are emotionless and uninspiring. Slipped in is some unnecessary humour, usually supplied by Paul Giamatti (aptly named Limbo) and you never feel any danger or threat from the apes apart from Thade. Also, there’s no likable characters to really root for. Nevertheless, nothing can save nominated director and visionary Tim Burton’s incarnation of Apes.

The fist ten minutes and the last two are probably the most attention-grabbing of this version but with an estimated budget $100,000,000 there’s no excuse for the travesty in between. Thankfully Rise of the Apes (2011) put the series on track.

Science fiction, a long, long time ago in space the final frontier…
Way back in the USA 1916 a pioneering underwater film based on Jules Verne novel 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea was made. In social commentary contrast the European Metropolis(1926) followed. Then the atomic bomb caused a renewed interest in science, a boom in science fiction happend in 1950’s,  1968 saw the Planet of the Apes and 2001: A Space Odyssey and the rest is history as they say. Is so difficult it pick out sci-fi films because there are so many and they such an array of topics.
I’ve covered some of the mainstream ones, including Alien, Blade Runner, Moon and Stars Wars in in my previous posts
and

So below are some modern notable Sci-fi films that are either underrated or overstated, that is in my personal opinion.

Ultraviolet (2006)
The opening few minutes of Kurt Wimmer’s Ultraviolet is a rip roaring, pulse pounding set up of action sequences and chases. Then the film calms down for a little breather until the next amazing fight sequence.
Following a holocaust some humans have become Hemophages, a sub-species with enhanced physical abilities. Violet, must protect a nine-year-old boy who has been marked for death by the human government.
In the wake of 2005’s disappointing Aeon Flux, underrated Kurt Wimmer director of Equilibrium (2002) writer of The Recruit (2003) and Salt (2010) set about creating an up-to-the-minute Sci-fi.However, after shooting wrapped Kurt left after being pressured to deliver less emotional PG-13 rated film. In turn, Ultraviolet was completely re-edited by the studio and unfortunately this lowered the quality of the film significantly. Acting wise, William Fichtner puts in an unusual performance, Sebastien Andrieu and Nick Chinlund both seem unsure what’s going on.
With an abundance of forgettable bad guys, Milla Jovovich excellently plays Violet who has enhanced speed, incredible stamina and acute intelligence. Her character at first seems very one dimensional as she plays her usual Resident Evil kick-ass self. But even in the short running time her character develops, you’re given glimpses into here past, as she bonds with six played well by Cameron Bright.
There’s great effects, stunts and a thumping score. A lot of reviews have criticised the CGI usage, however, it’s stylised, hyper-real and sleek. It’s not meant to be faithful representation of a real world. Holograms, swords, a new invented language, gun-fighting and martial arts. It’s science fiction entertainment, set 21st century, nothing more, nothing less.
It’s fast, it’s fun – Ultraviolet is an pleasing sci-fi action but possibly could have been so much more if Wimmer was allowed to deliver his cut.
The Road (2009)
The Road is a touching film of a father bonding with his son in post-apocalyptic setting where stealing, gangs and cannibalism has become the norm’.
John Hillcoat delivers a breathtaking dark vision, and while the story is emotionally engaging it never becomes captivating. It is excellently written and Viggo Mortensen is first-rate as the troubled father, who tries to educated and prepare his son for this new harsh world. However, Robert Duvall, Charlize Theron and Guy Pearce are sorely under utilised.
Its not a film to be enjoyed and you need an acquired taste. Nevertheless, it is arguably the most truthful and touching post-apocalyptic film to date, but also the least rewarding.
Thirteenth Floor (1999)
Made the same year as The Matrix, Thirteenth Floor was lost in ‘bullet time’, leather coats and guns and sadly failed to be appreciated or reach a large audience.The set decorations are of a high-quality, the CGI effects are very subtle and mostly used to recreate L.A.
The cast are excellent, notably Armin Mueller-Stahl as Fuller and the charming Gretchen Mol. Writer/Director Josef Rusnak delivers a perfect vision of a virtual reality simulation of 1937 Los Angeles against the distinguished cold sleek computer enterprise. The contrast of the past and present is astounding, this murder mystery oozes atmosphere.
Craig Bierko plays Douglas Hall who cannot recall the night his colleague was murdered. Now a suspect he tries to uncover the truth, but the reality is harsher than he could ever imagine.With a twisting script based on the book by Daniel F. Galouye it is a well made grounded sci-fi that is sorely underrated and overlooked.
It’s must see for those who don’t need big bangs and explosions in their Science fiction.

Æon Flux (2005)
Æon Flux was lost in the flurry of 2005’s sci-fi films, including Doom, Star Wars: Episode III, Serenity and War of the Worlds. Not even Terminator producer Gale Anne Hurd or Charlize Theron in tight outfits (even though less revealing than in the cartoons) could draw in the crowd.
Looking back fans of the MTV animated Æon Flux felt short changed, and I don’t blame them. The character of the film adaptation is very different to what fans had grown to love, an amoral, egotistical, volatile and sharp Æon. Where as the movie incarnation of Æon is plain moody and vulnerable. However, if you view Æon Flux as a standalone movie it’s a more rewarding experience.
Æon is assigned to assassinate the leader of last city on earth, but she uncovers a world of secrets and conspiracies. Packed with styled sets and costumes, there’s plenty to enjoy on screen. It’s different to most films set in the future, no grit, everything in 2415 is bright and hopeful but there is an atmosphere of something lurking under the facade.
There are some great special effects and action sequences. Marton Csokas is the perfect protagonist and Theron delivers a physical performance that she clearly put a lot of time and effort into. Nevertheless, the usually great Pete Postlethwaite is wasted and Jonny Lee Miller appears subdued throughout.
The film is competently directed by Jennifer’s Body’s (2009) director Karyn Kusama, it’s packed with some great sci-fi idea’s, including an array of weapons, genetically enhanced characters and gadgets. However, the screenplay is full of clichés and some jarring editing that’ll make you feel a lot of interesting stuff maybe on the cutting room floor.
While Kurt Wimmer’s Ultraviolet (2006) is slightly better and more fun and if you put aside the fantastic animated series, Aeon flux is still entertaining.
Avatar (2009)
Zoe Saldana (Star Trek) as Neytiri is fantastic, as usual Sam Worthington (Terminator Salvation) is well cast in a strong lead role. Giovanni Ribisi, Sigourney Weaver and Michelle Rodriguez’s brief appearances are welcomed. Also Stephen Lang, as the tough Colonel Miles Quaritch gives a great performance.
Avatar is a visual spectacular with great acting and effects. It’s a moralistic tale, of following orders or protecting an alien world. However, the story is lazy, reminiscent Cameron’s own Aliens, Dances with Wolves, Apocalypto and Pocahontas to name a few. It mirrors Custers last stand, Vietnam and many other conflicts throughout history.
While the effects in creating the moon Pandora are mind-blowing, the lack of originality leaves you disappointed. I’m sure teenagers will teens love it, it’s the perfect money maker. James Cameron is a fantastic director and is instrumental in pushing industry movie techniques forward. However, in all the special CGI effects the great writer Cameron appears to have forgotten about his older fans, who wanted a meatier, original and complex story.

Carriers (2009)
Carriers follows a group of young survivors who make some tough choices after an infection has spread worldwide bringing civilisation to its knees.
There are a few harrowing and emotional parts in Carriers but it fails to connect with the viewer. Unusually pretty Piper Perabo and Chris Pine (of Star Trek fame) leads an excellent small group of unknown actors in a well directed virus survival film. However, Carriers is simply an anomaly, there’s no gloss, it has the spirit of big budget ‘The Road’.
The cinematography is great, the music and the script are fine but it feels too long and flat. It’s missing that impending doom atmosphere considering the characters hopeless situation.It is by no means a bad film, it explores morals and values, however, its just not very engaging or entertaining.
I’m sure directors/writers Àlex Pastor and David Pastor will go on to do something really great, but this just isn’t it.

Star Trek (2009)
J.J. Abrams incarnation of the phenomena known as Star Trek, wisely sticks closed to the spirit, look and fun of the original TV series. It follows the young James T. Kirk and his fellow USS Enterprise crew-members as they battle in space against a time travelling alien species.
With a star studded cast including Eric Bana, Bruce Greenwood, funny man Simon Pegg, reliable Karl Urban, and the exquisite Zoe Saldana as Uhura, it really is a pleasure to watch.
If you’ve never seen Star Trek it doesn’t matter as the story can be viewed as a stand alone sci-fi adventure film. However, die-hard fans will love the references to earlier Star Trek stories and characters.
Recommend, new version of a sci-fi classic.
News, movie developments, but firstly, I’d like to sincerely thank all those who have purchased and read Blood Hunger, feedback has been very positive and I’m glad it has been well received, especially by die-hard vampire fans and the USA audience.
As I’ve mentioned in previous posts I continued shaping Blood Hunger, writing a definitive vampire tale true to the original origins but an injecting a modern spin and twist. And at times it is ambiguous but it was required for the reader to link and solve some of the mystery.

Picture from fullhalloween.com
Thankfully or worryingly, everyone seemed to have warmed to the cold-blooded killer vampire sisters Monica, Gabriella and the mysterious Iliana. And that Nettie Johns character hit a nerve.

The 1477 A.D segments of the book that follow the downfall of the vampire brothers Vlad, Mircea, Radu and Stellan – I tired to encompass the 15th century history as oppose to Bram’s 1897 Victorian London, and I love that readers ‘got it’ and liked the contrast in setting. Talking of contrast in setting, my research and correspondence with the police on the chapters set in the present day really helped give those parts some realism. Detective Michaels and explorer Lucia turned out well and I’m looking forward to seeing their film incarnations.

Unfortunately, after attending development meetings with the first producers  it’s apparent that the movie adaptation may omit the 1477 A.D segments due to budget constraints. I am in the process of pushing it’s development forward.  Hopefully it will exceed Terminus popularity.

Ultimately, I set out two write a definitive vampire story that encompasses and pays tribute to the myth and legend, which has such an affect on today’s pop culture. However, I was very conscientious to write something different to Meyer, Rice and so on, who’s work I have not read but have heard a lot about. I hope Blood Hunger continues to capture the imagination of new readers that have been surrounded by only Twilight, Vampire Diaries and True Blood types respectfully, while at the same time satisfying hammer fans and lovers of the vampire and Dracula legend itself.

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I’ll be giving away Blood hunger T-shirts and stuff

Order your copy here: Blood Hunger

Watch the 1st and exclusive trailer for Terminus from Innerface films. The film is based on A.M.Esmonde’s Blood Hunger novel

Terminus Trailer

Terminus trailer from Sean Parsons on Vimeo.

Exclusive! Terminus Preview Clip

Check this out! The latest clip from Blood Hunger Terminus!
This intelligent action vampire film is imminent from Innerface Films…

  • CLICK HERE
    It looks fantastic, we can wait to sink out teeth into the full version!