Posts Tagged ‘entertainment’

I watched alien comedy Paul (2011) recently which got me thinking about E.T (1982), where my dad would make me wear his Parker, hold a torch and say “phone home” – those warm a fuzzy days eh. It got me thinking about alien films in general. There’s been some turkeys recently The Fourth Kind, The Day the Earth Stood Still (2008) to name just two. I’m a sucker for alien invasion films, call me a geek (but it’s hardly surprising coming from the guy who still recall the lyrics to the 60’s Iron-Man and Captain America cartoon theme tunes,the re-runs). I must say I wasn’t a fan of Independence Day (1996) or Men In Black (1997) maybe it’s that watered down/appease the masses/play it safe middle of the road stuff that entertains but doesn’t excite or entice. Whereas Tim Burton’s Mars Attacks (1996) was all out dark comedy and Invasion of the Body Snatchers tackles the subject ominously sober for me it’s those films that are just more appealing.
Check out the Cellulord’s blog where he wonderfully breaks those Invaders down into five sub-genres.
Here’ a few thoughts on those mass invasion stories that you may have missed or simply avoided from various reasons.
Battle: Los AngelesBattle: Los Angeles (2011)
A platoon of U.S. Marines during a global alien invasion try to stay alive and take hold of Los Angeles while extracting a group of innocent civilians.
Battle: Los Angeles shares of much of the look and relentless extraterrestrial attack of Skyline (2010). However, where Skyline portrayed it from civilian point to view this is very much a story from the perspective of the Armed Forces.
Chris Bertolini’s screen-play pushes heroism and all its clichés to the limit, at times the film plays as a training or recruitment U.S. Marines video with each character needing to plug the name of every type of weapon used. Although there is a consistent overuse of a shaky handy-cam effect a credit should to go to director Jonathan Liebesman as the set ups are well covered with a feeling of geography so you never feel lost in the quick pans or sharp movements. It’s a serious stab at the subject matter and the effects are outstanding, mirroring the realism of Monsters (2010) and District 9 (2009) to name a few.
Both Ramón Rodríguez and Michelle Rodriguez are notable but it is Aaron Eckhart as a veteran SSgt. Michael Nantz who carries the most credence.
Reminiscent of Cloverfield (2008), Black Hawk Down (2001) and Saving Private Ryan (1998) – if there’s room for another alien invasion with a war element flick this will appease but if you feel you’ve seen it all before it’s probably because you have.
Overall, formulaic but still mildly entertaining.
V: The Complete Second Season [Blu-ray]“V” (2009-2011)
Before Alien Nation, before Independence Day, there was V. A race of human looking extraterrestrials arrive on earth. These ‘vistors’ led by alien Anna come in peace, however, behind her smile is a sinister plan to take over the world.
The latest ‘reimagining’ of V is a competent rework of the original 80’s TV show. Despite some ropey CGI effects, the story, characters and script carry some weight, there are shades of grey, not everything is black and white… Unorthodox alliances, double crossings, morale choices and sacrifice are just some of the themes amongst a cloak and dagger alien invasion. There is action, drama and of course it’s played possibly as realistic as you can get considering it a show about lizard aliens.
Jane Badler the original female protagonist appears in season 2 as ‘Diana’ which is a nice nod for fans of the predecessor albeit as a different character with the same name. And also Marc Singer gives a cameo. Notable are actors Scott Wolf and Laura Vandervoort. Worth mentioning is Anna’s right hand man played by Morena Baccarin and tough guy Kyle Hobbes played by Charles Mesure.
Evil executives at ABC have cancelled the series after season/series 2 which is a crying shame as there were plenty of places V could have been taken with the right story writers and good characters already established such as FBI agent Erica Evans, played by Elizabeth Mitchell and Joel Gretsch as Father Jack Landry.
It’s said that it ends on a cliff hanger but that depends on who’s side your on, there is one winner, if no more are made… Worth seeing, I’ll now finish this sentence as abruptly as ABC’s cancellation.
MonstersMonsters (2010)
For six years large aliens have been on earth and inhabit the ‘infected zone’ between the US and Mexico border. After a monster destroys a hotel the daughter of an executive is injured and under instruction from his boss a photographer must ensure she gets back to the US. However, after a series of events it becomes more difficult than expected and they both must journey through the infected zone.
Début leads Whitney Able and Scoot McNairy are impeccably first-rate and would put any A-lister to shame. Any lesser casting could have ruined the film but the realistic portrayal they deliver, packed with emotion is easy to relate to, it’s surprising how they command the screen and keep you enthralled. The rest of the uncredited cast are exceptional and everything is played for realism. Note worthy is the ticket selling desk clerk.
The dreamlike score is fantastic, Jon Hopkins’ beats and hums capture and heighten the moments – it’s very memorable, reminiscent of John Murphy’s 28 weeks later subtler moments.
Credit must go to director/writer Gareth Edwards for the fantastic subtle script, great locations and fantastically executed effects. Whether intentional or not there’s plenty of social commentary, political values and society reflective parallels going on but those aside Monsters is a journey of two people finding themselves.
At first I was expecting another War of the Worlds rehash, District 9, a grounded version of ID4, or even a better version of Skyline but what I got was a journey story with aliens as the back drop. If only Jurassic Park could have been filmed in this style. Monsters took me by surprise, I didn’t expect it to be such a wonderful film.
Gareth Edwards is certainly a multi-talented individual and not one to watch – as he’s already there. Immersible cinema.
SkylineSkyline (2010)
Stop me if you heard this before. Aliens invade earth and a handful of survivors try to escape their impending deaths. It’s another War of the Worlds-esque invasion flick and what’s nice about this is that it’s played straight with no comedic one-liners and there’s not a teenager in sight.
Directors Colin Strause and Greg Strause are no strangers to special effects after bringing to life the Predators and Aliens in AVPR (2007) and the rest of the team behind Skyline’s extraterrestrials are clearly talented making the best out of a budget. It’s visually wonderful, the special effects are fantastic. Nevertheless, Aliens (1986) designers and suit wearers Alec Gillis and Tom Woodruff Jr. creature designs appear to be an unoriginal mix of The Fly, Independence Day, Cloverfield and The Matrix.
The acting is above average and the leads including Eric Balour and Brittany Daniel carry the emotion well. David Zayas is notable but his screen time is limited. That said, the script lacks enough meaty dialogue to keep you enthralled and you find yourself waiting for more glimpses and shenanigans of the alien invaders.
Overall, it looks great but it fails to connect and grip you. The Brothers Strause will hit gold but Skyline just isn’t it.
They Live Poster Movie 11x17 Roddy Piper Keith David Meg Foster George "Buck" FlowerThey Live (1988)
Humanlike, skeleton looking, extraterrestrial’s have taken over the Earth and walk among us, but are cloaked by a transmitter that makes ‘them’ appear like us. A drifter discovers a pair of sunglasses that allows him to see what is being hidden.
Halloween’s (1978) horror legend writer/director John Carpenter does his best with a limited budget. The film for the most part has an urban realistic look, due to the on location shots, however, at times it appears very cheap and lacks the production values of The Thing (1982) or The Fog (1980). In true Carpenter tradition there’s a heart pumping and relentless score.
Amongst all the 80’s cheese there is a fantastic story based on Ray Nelson’s short story. They Live themes reflects consumerism, class and corruption to name a few. Underneath, Carpenter’s bland screenplay lay a fear that we are not in control and our society is led by ‘them’, echoing Invasion of the Body Snatchers and ‘V’. To join them would be to give I and we would benefit but we’ll pay a greater price. They Live is high concept sci-fi with great ideas, the sunglasses touch is genius, that’s original and allows some great visuals and interesting moments. There’s also the intriguing secret society aspect and space travel.
Suffering from the 80’s macho testerone Roddy Piper is entertaining as the lead but he’s no great actor, lucky there’s the likes of Meg Foster and Keith David to gives the film some weight and there are some good performances from the supporting cast.
Carpenter though a simple story immerses the viewer in the conspiracy and connects us with the heroes search for the truth which has a fantastic, un-Hollywood brave and downbeat ending. In addition, the effects are of the time but are still effective, there are some stand out set-ups, the supermarket, the underground segment and the discovery of the sunglasses. I’m hesitant to use the word, but They Live is cool.
With so many remakes in recent years They Live would benefit from a serious and heavier version. That said, taken at face value it’s a great fun ride, with one-liners, action and aliens.
The InvasionThe Invasion (2007)
An alien lifeform crashes to Earth, spreading tainted debris this in turn infects people bringing them under the invaders control.
Remake of remakes and based on Jack Finney novel, thankfully The Invasion borrows more from Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) and as a plus doesn’t try to recreate its daring chilling ending, coming up with its own penultimate finish.
The supporting cast are great and include ’78’s Veronica Cartwright. It is a fine cast ensemble that reunites Jeffrey Wright and Daniel Craig in two effective roles as they help Carol Bennell played by Nicole Kidman find her son and stop a virus that is turning humans into ‘perfect’ emotionless shells of themselves.
Already off to a head start, based on such excellent source material director Oliver Hirschbiegel brings David Kajganich interesting screenplay to life. It’s subtle at times but injects plenty of foot and car chases. The on location shooting sells the tension as you see the city’s people change. Make up effect are fantastic and not too overboard. The good use of lighting, camera angels backed up with a nail biting score helps to heightening the paranoia as everyone Bennell knows becomes one of ‘them.’
Kidman’s endless supply of unnecessary fitted clothing and botox aside, she gives a good performance and despite some surprisingly already dated effects shots of microscopic virus the film is well crafted.
Overall, if not compared to its predecessors, The Invasion ticks all the boxes as a retelling of a character driven, sharp, thrilling sci-fi.
John Carpenter's The Thing - Movie Poster (Size: 24" x 36")The Thing (1982)
After being freed from its ancient crash site an extraterrestrial life form infiltrates an Antarctic research station, imitating taking the appearance of the researchers that it kills.
An atmospheric understated sci-fi at it best. I’ll never understand how Carpenter lost the lustre in some of the other film he made, nevertheless, his Thing is one of his best movies and also once of the best sci-fi movies ever. Despite being based on the same source material (before remakes were popular) the thing has a look and feel of it’s own and is very different from its 50’s counterpart.
The isolated setting, the astounding cinematography and scenery creates intrigue; drawing you in from the very beginning. It’s a perfect horror/sci-fi cocktail of Ennio Morricone’s haunting foreboding score, Rob Bottin and Stan Winston’s benchmark practical effects (which are to-date arguably unsurpassed) Carpenters claustrophobic set ups and Bill Lancaster screenplay.
It’s rare that every single actor is exceptional and supplied with effective dialogue. All the cast from Kurt Russell to Wilford Brimley as Blair are all captivating, great casting by Anita Dann. The characters have their own issues and as the paranoia sets in relationships are forged and other broken, building to a bold and satisfying conclusion.
This is more than just a cult film with a ‘monster’ hiding in warm places surrounded by snow, it’s a finely tuned science fiction horror masterpiece.
Photo Actor Anthony Hopkins, smoking cigar. 1997Welsh greats, there’s been a few notably Richard Burton, although he made some dud films (Exorcist 2, ew) he was rightly known for his Epics, small dramas, drinking, marriages to Elizabeth Taylor and infamously narrating Jeff Wayne’s War of the Worlds. And not forgetting his rendition of Dylan Thomas’ Under Milkwood. Surprisingly he never got a star on Hollywood’s walk of fame which is outrageous. There’s not been a Welsh man like him since. Anthony Hopkins is extremely different – very personal, arguably unfathomable yet captivating, however, he wasn’t blessed with the leading man Hollywood looks of Burton but struck gold with the character of Hannibal Lecter (see the faces of Lecter).
ANTHONY HOPKINS 11X14 PHOTOOver the years Hopkins has threatened retirement several times but never followed through, maybe the money draws him back being the son of a baker and coming from less than affluent Port Talbot. Incidentally it was Burton who encouraged Hopkins to become an actor and he enrolled at the Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama in Cardiff graduating in 1957. He has always had a love of music and in 1986, he released a single called ‘Distant Star’.
SpartacusAs well as many other acting parallels with Burton and sadly some personal ones. Sadly they both had an alcoholism problem and failed marriages. That said, Hopkins overcame his addiction. In 1992 he narrated a Jeff Wayne musical Spartacus with fellow Welsh girl Catherine Zeta Jones. While not as successful as War of the Worlds it was paradoxically significant mirroring Burton’s 1978 collaboration with Wayne due to his smooth, weighty Welsh tone.
Magic [Blu-ray]It would be difficult to comment on Hopkins varied and rich body of work, a star himself he has worked alongside the many of the most renowned names. Personally, for me the aptly titled Magic (filmed the year Burton was recording War of the Worlds) which in my opinion is Hopkins defining film moment, encompassing an array of balanced emotions including a creepy, mesmerizing and venerable performance, that no stage play can capture for all time. Thanks to film it’s there forever to be enjoyed. For me even though he picked up an Oscar for Silence of the Lambs it’s the aforementioned that is arguably award worthy (it sadly only picked up a Saturn and Edgar award).
ANTHONY HOPKINS 11X14 PHOTO
Since Lambs he’s had much success although many performances appear to be Sir Hopkins picking up a pay cheque, and rightly so. Each line could easily have been replaced by “okey dokey” with equal effect. “Okey dokey Mr Hunt”; “Alexander was Great, okey dokey”, “okey dokey CGI Beowulf”; “okey dokey Mina Harker”;“okey dokey Clarice”; “okey dokey you Wolfman” and “I am Odin okey dokey Thor my son”; you get the picture.
Thor Movie 11x17 HD Photo Poster Anthony Hopkins Odin #24Debateably Fracture, Remains of the Day, Nixon and The Edge aside many of Hopkins films have the okey dokey factor that I can’t help feel is Sir Anthony Hopkins cheeky Welsh boy smiling way of saying – thank you very much Hollywood, you are the embodiment of everything I am not…Tee-hee, while laughing all the way to the bank… and good for him!

Hellraiser - Clive Barker - Movie Poster Lobby Card - 8 x 10

As a horror fan the Hellraiser Series elludes me, it has such an interesting premise and concepts, puzzles, keepers of hell, resurrection and redemption to name a few. The first two films have excellent raw, wet, blood effects that few horror movies, especially at the time offered. Still despite all it’s allure the Hellraiser series has been so unjustly realised which is simply hellraising considering the fan following of the character Pinhead (wonderfully played by Doug Bradley) and the Cenobites that have captured the imagination of horror goers.
Both Hellraiser: Inferno (2000) (#5) and Hellseeker (2002) (#6) are above average productions with their fair share of blood and chills. Hellseeker sees the return of Kirsty briefly but both amount to nothing more than Creepshow Twilight zone tales with Pinhead featuring in a bookend capacity with more of the same in Hellraiser: Deader (#7) and Hellraiser: Hellworld (#8).
Hellraiser - Hellworld
A 9th, Revelations was filmed without Bradley which was produced in a matter of weeks due to an obligation on Dimension Films’ part to release another Hellraiser film or risk losing the rights to the franchise. It was the pin in the coffin for the direct to video entries. Nevertheless, there is hope with a possible Hellraiser remake, ghastly or entertaining time will tell but look what became of Freddy, Jason and Leatherface… Below are my thoughts on the theatrical released instalments…
The remains of a man rise from the dead and is aided by his sister-in-law to regenerate his body. However, he is being chased by demons who want to return him to their hell.

Hellraiser

A modestly budgeted horror with memorable cult impact, fantastically realised by writer, director Clive Barker. It’s sadomasochism, blood and gore influenced many films to follow. The music complements the claustrophobic atmosphere and adds to the films tension. 80’s poor lightening visuals aside the practical effects are excellent, including skinned, pinned and mutilated people.
Hellraiser - Clive Barker - Movie Poster Lobby Card - 8 x 10Surprisingly it’s Kirsty Cotton’s (Ashley Laurence) fight against her uncle and stepmother that is at the core story. Lead Cenobite ‘Pinhhead’ (that the series is synonymous for) is calmly played by Doug Bradley and has very little screen-time, yet leaves an impact. There’s great characterisation executed admirably by Andrew Robinson as wimpy Larry, Clare Higgins as adulteress Julia and Sean Chapman as power hungry Frank.
Hellraiser is creepy, bloody and eerie. It’s just a shame that neither this or any of the sequels capitalise on its greatest assets, that is Frank and Pinhead.
Hellbound: Hellraiser II - 20th Anniversary Edition Kirsty is brought to an institution after the death of her family, where the occult-obsessive Dr. Philip Channard resurrects Julia and unleashes the Cenobites once again.
It’s no surprise it was released the same year as Phantasm II, Friday the 13th Part VII and A Nightmare on Elm Street 4, having one of horrors most surprising memorable and bankable protagonists. However, Hellbound borrows some elements from A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987) and feels as if it had money thrown at it and was rushed to capitalise on the success of the first.
Hellbound: Hellraiser II Poster Movie (11 x 17 Inches - 28cm x 44cm)As a side note director Tony Randel arguably captures the imagination of Clive Barker correctly as its style appears to be the foundation for Barker’s own Nightbreed (1990).
There’s plenty to enjoy, the dark oozing blood effects, the return of almost all the original cast and of course the Cenobites and Pinhead himself. The music is fantastic, as too are the costumes and SFX. That said, the story is disjointed on occasion causing it to feel longer than it’s running time, almost never-ending with one crescendo after another.
Overall, compared to the first and traditional movie styled Hellraiser third Hellbound: Hellraiser II is average and hellishly overrated.
Hellraiser III: Hell on EarthA work of art contains ‘Pinhead’ who is hellbent on escaping and unleashing hell on earth, armed with a puzzle box can reporter Joey Summerskill stop his evil?
Clive Barker is absent from a writing role which leaves Peter Akins to take up the reigns and to his credit this screen-play connects the previous films via various flash backs and recordings. However, the story follows a more linear narrative than it’s predecessor. Follow up Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth swaps the grittiness of the modestly budgeted first for a glossier grander slicker 3rd. Pinhead is given more story, dialogue and exposition – possibly to appease a wider audience.
Hellraiser 3 - Movie Poster (Size: 27'' x 40'')Hell on earth is really a one-man-show, British actor Doug Bradley is allowed to give a pleasing head-to-head performance as both Pinhead and his former-self Captain Elliot Spencer. Terry Ferrell as the snooping reporter who walks the film playing the genre piece like an 80s thriller. There are some new less-menacing cenobites, that said,Terri/Female Cenobite played by Paula Marshall is noteworthy but her appearance is all too brief. The rest of the cast are forgettable, mainly their purpose is to allow Pinhead some elaborate torture kills.
The special effects (although now dated) are digestible and oddly even though this film was made in 1992 it feels late eighties. Director Anthony Hickox competently delivers an entertaining instalment despite the choppy editing, lack of tension and gore. Nevertheless, there are enough dream sequences, dead bodies and bloody scenes to keep most chill seekers happy until the explosive final act.
Overall, in a traditional movie sense Hellraiser III is arguably a very strong sequel and viewer is left with tantalising closing scene, but in retrospect the concept is an empty promise.
Hellraiser - BloodlineThis instalment of Hellraiser IV follows the bloodline of the creator of the puzzle box the ‘Toy Maker’ and his plan to summon and to destroy Pinhead forever.
Despite a theatrical release, bloodline looks and feels TV movie-like and the acting is below average, possibly due to the script. That said, Doug Bradley is fine as Pinhead and Valentina Vargas is note-worthy as the demon Angelique.
The story’s concept is quite good, and includes (one assumes) the building in the 3rd and the history of the box. It is told in flash-backs by Dr. Paul Merchant in the year 2127 and follows his descendants Phillip L’Merchant in the 18th century and John Merchant in 1996. Sadly, it’s just poorly executed and let down by an uneven screenplay, bland direction and sub-par sets. The effects are a mixed bag, some are well done while others are less-convincing and tame.
Hellraiser 4 - Movie Poster (Size: 27'' x 40'')
It appears to have a troubled shooting history as there were two directors Alan Smithee (under an alias Kevin Yagher) and Joe Chappelle (uncredited). This maybe one cause and result of such a less than satisfying fourth.
Overall, producers didn’t give such a bankable character as Pinhead the attention he deserved leaving the viewer as empty as the 22nd century space setting.

A London gangster is recently released from prison and tries to go straight after being offered a job by a clinically depressed borderline agoraphobic celebrity. However, he’s forcefully reined back into ‘the business’ by Gant a psychotic criminal boss.
A star-studded and familiar face cast come together in William Monahan’s passionate compelling and compulsory underworld film that manages to capture a contemporary 60’s feel. It benefit’s from an on location look which is wonderfully and stylishly shot capturing both beauty and darkness of L.A. and London. The back drop of London feels like a character itself with something interesting always going on screen.
For some reason despite the formulaically worn genre Boulevard manages to stay fresh. Colin Farrell’s main character Mitchell is likable, interesting and dynamic with a Steve McQueen air about him.
The character relationship dimensions and interactions are intriguing and a little bit different from the usual Brit flick considering linear story thanks to a at times ambiguous script. Leads Farrell, Keira Knightley and Ray Winstone are on fine form. And both David Thewlis and Ben Chaplin steal the show with their contrasting character performances. There are loads of great supporting actor appearances, Eddie Marsan,Matt King,Tim Plester and Sanjeev Bhaskar to name a few. Notable is Briony, Mitchell ‘s alcoholic sister played excellently by Anna Friel.

US director Monahan has created a slick, witty, violent and soulfully hard hitting film. It’s a quality production and despite the soundtrack being repetitive at times and a choppy last act – London Boulevard is near on perfection for the genre.
Reminiscent of Layer Cake (2004) quite frankly it’s the UK’s Carlito’s Way (1993), Colin Farrell’s Charlie Brigante,which is a simply a good thing.
Their first bite will be your last
(Aiden Ashley)

Take a look at the latest provocative promo’s for the vampire novel Blood Hunger and the zombie horror Dead Pulse.

BLOOD HUNGER –
An explorer makes a discovery in Romania, dubbed the ‘Ice Prince’ find it is significant enough to put him and his girlfriend Lucia Ferrara in the media spotlight. Iliana and her sister’s journey to the United Kingdom, news that the ‘Ice Prince’ had been discovered ceases their many years of blood abstinence and they unleash a bloodthirsty terror on humankind leaving a trail of death from London to the Welsh countryside.

An age of blood abstinence ends…
(Karlie Montana)
From the fall of the vampire and the Dracul brothers in medieval Europe to their return in the present day. Prepare yourself, their first bite will be your last!
Vampires want roses too
(Amy Reid)

A definitive and fresh reinvention of the vampire legend. Inspired by the spirit of Bram Stoker’s novel ‘Dracula’, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s novella ‘Carmilla’, ‘Hammer Horror’s’ film series and cult horror ‘The Hunger’.


The dead have returned to life… 

Being dead no longer means the end…
(Jayme Langford)

The world’s focus is on the city of Ravenswood and the once idyllic town of Farmore as platoons and scattered survivors fight the hordes of the dead, unbeknownst one of them holds the key to end the undead’s reign of mayhem.

Across the city at a body disposal plant a small group take shifts on the ‘death watch’. Their hopes hinge on the soldiers of Farmore to rescue them. But with no contact for months, no food and surrounded by the dead, have they got what it takes to survive?

Just eat me
(Karlie Montana)

With death at their door, only time can tell…

The author of ‘Blood Hunger’, A. M. Esmonde re-imagines his often imitated ‘The Breathing Dead’ novella in his latest George A. Romero and Lucio Fulci inspired zombie horror adventure, Dead Pulse.




With kind permission from cutting edge adult erotic photograph site Juliland.com with the legendary photographers Helmut Newton,Chris Von Wagenheim and Richard Avery.


Alyssa Milano Poster Lavender Lingerie
What have Underworld, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Van Helsing got in common? No not girl power. Answer: Heroines.Where does Lucia Ferrara fit in this feisty bunch amongst a love struck teenager similar to Twilight’s Bella Swan? Kick-ass characters like Buffy, Selene and Anna Valerious. A damsel in distress, Wilhelmina “Mina” Harker as in the tradition of Bram Stoker’s Dracula novel. Lucia is like none of the above…
Kristen Stewart 11X17 Poster Banner Photo - Smokin Hot! New! #05What she has got in common is that she’s a fictional character, a heroine who finds herself in an extraordinary and dangerous situations faced with deadly choices. She’s an everyday woman, just like you. No super powers, no desire to become a vampire, no longing to marry Jonathan Harker. She pouts and snorts when she laughs. Her problems are balancing her work, health, friends, relationships, men and family.

Trading in Zumba, aerobics classes every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday for something a little tougher like Kalaripayat or sparing sessions, she likes to keep herself in shape. Despite being beautiful, with the looks of her mother (who she tragically lost to cancer) and celebrities Alyssa Milano and Mila Kunis, she still feels self-conscience and insecure about herself.

Lucia Grace Ferrara went to a public school and then Goldsmith University, London picking up a BA (Hons) in English and American Literature. After the death of her father she has only his friend and her godfather Robert Morgan to look out for her and her boyfriend Max to rely on. However, this is her greatest flaw thinking she needs a man in her life to make her feel strong,(a replacement for her deceased father?).

That said, her life changes when Max makes a find that puts him on the cover of  the tabloids and she gets an unwanted slice of fame. She meets a captivating, woman named Iliana in a museum and soon Lucia is drawn into a world of mystery and deception. It’s it not long after this ‘chance’ encounter that she is implicated in a murder and has Adrian Michaels a D.I contacting her to be questioned. Little does she know that a frozen body her mountaineering boyfriend has discovered is linked to this enigmatic woman and she instinctively knows that something is not quite right.

Encounters at the museums, several invitations, a masque ball, an outdoor music show and lavish dinners entwined with death, mutation and infatuation and she finds herself in a web of deceit within a rabbit hole.And her life is turned upside down when she meets a man named Stellan.

Lucia is given an old book which gives her an insight to who’s body has been found and who this woman may really be. Soon she finds herself questioning her sanity and decisions as these strangers offer so much and ask for so little. Before long she is forced to go head to head with Iliana, her sisters and even Stellan. It increasing becomes difficult to remove herself from the dreamlike, perilous, situations and locations she finds herself in.

There are endless actresses that would make the perfect Lucia Ferrara, personally I like the idea of Jaime Murray, but casting direction was never my forté,  who would you chose?

Are there any elements of  Bella, Selene or Mina in Lucia, that’s for the reader of Blood Hunger to decide. One thing is for sure, Lucia maybe the most unlikely of characters to have ever faced and uncovered real evil…
Blood Hunger cover

Blood Hunger is out now.

Audiobook on iTunes
Anyone that has listened my interviews over the years will know that I’m a fan of Hammer Horror films, but if I may add it’s in the oddest sense, they are not the greatest productions ever made but they have a Gothic, eerie, charm of their own with some fine performances, setting, sets, theatrical scores and things that go bump in the night.
I discussed this with the outlandish Scream Queen Ingrid Pitt, it became all to clear to me, having children of my own that Universal classics like ‘Dracula’, ‘The Wolfman’ and ‘Frankenstein’ may never be seen not just by British youngsters but US and  the rest of worlds teens. That is unless they have some kind of horror influence in their lives and find stories, books , posters, of this genre of films intriguing to find out more.  Young people haven’t or don’t get the opportunity to see the older horror movies or Hammer films that inspired me and others like The Reptile (1966), The Gorgon (1964) and Plague of the Zombies (1966) to others such as From Beyond the Grave, Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors and The House That Dripped Blood. So when I heard about @cyberschizoid’s campaign (on Twitter) to bring back classic horror to BBC 2,  I had to do my bit in joining in by telling you about my fantasy horror double bill.
Now while I could tell you about an array of UK productions from The Ghoul (1933) to Vampire Lovers(1970) and likes of 1957’s The Curse of Frankenstein. Personally I’d love to see Dead People (1974) or Let’s Scare Jessica to Death (1971) on the BBC 2 but I’ve chosen titles a possibly less obvious to most and not British. I believe they would make great first viewing and have the drawing power to intrigue, inspire and capture the imagination of new comers of the genre.  So in true tradition of those BBC 2 days gone by here are my thoughts on an oldie black and white, followed by a colour film just like they were aired way back when…
BBC take note, I’d be happy to sit in a large leather chair in front of a log fire, in a drawing room and introduce these… And I’m a lot cheaper than Terry Wogan or Jonathan Ross. So turn that tuner, wait for the TV to heat up, this is my horror double bill…
Okay first up is Carnival of Souls (1962) and not a surprise to old school fans. A true horror classic Director Herk Harvey and writer John Clifford both waived their earnings in order to get the film made. Upon release in 1962 the film was a failure in the box office, thankfully its subsequent airings on late night television helped to gain it a strong cult following so Clifford and Herks work was not all in vain.
The delightful Candace Hilligoss is perfectly cast as the troubled woman that after surviving a traumatic car accident, that kills her two friends, becomes haunted by a frightening ghoul and drawn to a mysterious abandoned carnival. It’s a shame that Hilligoss only acted in two features as she gives an impressive performance as Mary Henry.
The music is very creepy and a little too intrusive in places, however, for it’s time and budget it is a well crafted film. Carnival of Souls many not be as sleek and stylish as the Haunting (1963) but it is far more eerie. The zombies are not as imposing as in Night of the Living Dead, however, they are vastly creepier and macabre.
Oozing atmosphere it’s a creative and unnerving film that concludes with a common place twist but back in ’62 it was ahead of it’s time, a true cult classic.
And onto the next…
Non si deve profanare il sonno dei morti”  (original title) I know its Spanish/ Italian production but it’s set in England and feel very Brit.A crop dusting machine from the agricultural pest-control is emitting ultra-sonic waves that are re-animating corpses… 


A lot have said this is underrated, granted it’s overlooked. It is Atmospheric with an ominous feel. It has great locations and is at times genuinely creepy. However, it’s shares more with Fulci than Romero. The acting is not aided by the bad dubbing. To its credit it has an eerie musical score by Giuliano Sorgini and a number of suspenseful sequences but it borrows many of its best sequences from Night of the Living Dead. 


I watched director Jorge Grau’s offering under the title of ‘Let Sleeping Corpse Lie’ but whichever name you see the film under don’t be mistaken or mislead, it’s a solid zombie horror movie and of its time with fine cinematography from Francisco Sempere. It’s a lot better than the low budget DTV zombie films that there’s no shortage of at the moment.

For more information about the campaign visit cyberschizoid blog

and check out fellow supporter Amanda Norman’s blog

The spin off film to my novel Blood Hunger has just been released – Directed and written by the great talent Sean Parsons.
Below is the Terminus Trailer:
You can now watch Terminus on Video On Demand click here
Sorry UK and the rest of the world, like Baby Ruth candy* it’s only available in the USA
*(citation needed)
So what is the vampire action drama Terminus about…
Ellicott City, a condemned paper mill, home of Anushka – a vampire assassin haunted by self-imposed isolation. Her vow to never feed on humans is tried when a chance meeting tests her resolve. Her first bite could be your last!

Self confessed horror fan, alternative model Sophia Disgrace is causing a stir with her latest photo shoot.

My horror presenter socked it to shocked passers-by as she took to the streets of London with a deathly ‘Snow White’ look.

Some of Ben Westwood’s (son of designer Vivienne) pictures capture Sophia latest look perfectly.

Look out for Sophia on the next Breathing Dead show or watch her on youtube!

News, movie developments, but firstly, I’d like to sincerely thank all those who have purchased and read Blood Hunger, feedback has been very positive and I’m glad it has been well received, especially by die-hard vampire fans and the USA audience.
As I’ve mentioned in previous posts I continued shaping Blood Hunger, writing a definitive vampire tale true to the original origins but an injecting a modern spin and twist. And at times it is ambiguous but it was required for the reader to link and solve some of the mystery.

Picture from fullhalloween.com
Thankfully or worryingly, everyone seemed to have warmed to the cold-blooded killer vampire sisters Monica, Gabriella and the mysterious Iliana. And that Nettie Johns character hit a nerve.

The 1477 A.D segments of the book that follow the downfall of the vampire brothers Vlad, Mircea, Radu and Stellan – I tired to encompass the 15th century history as oppose to Bram’s 1897 Victorian London, and I love that readers ‘got it’ and liked the contrast in setting. Talking of contrast in setting, my research and correspondence with the police on the chapters set in the present day really helped give those parts some realism. Detective Michaels and explorer Lucia turned out well and I’m looking forward to seeing their film incarnations.

Unfortunately, after attending development meetings with the first producers  it’s apparent that the movie adaptation may omit the 1477 A.D segments due to budget constraints. I am in the process of pushing it’s development forward.  Hopefully it will exceed Terminus popularity.

Ultimately, I set out two write a definitive vampire story that encompasses and pays tribute to the myth and legend, which has such an affect on today’s pop culture. However, I was very conscientious to write something different to Meyer, Rice and so on, who’s work I have not read but have heard a lot about. I hope Blood Hunger continues to capture the imagination of new readers that have been surrounded by only Twilight, Vampire Diaries and True Blood types respectfully, while at the same time satisfying hammer fans and lovers of the vampire and Dracula legend itself.

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I’ll be giving away Blood hunger T-shirts and stuff

Order your copy here: Blood Hunger