Posts Tagged ‘Aaron Poole’

Forsaken Movie Poster*** This review may contain spoilers ***
In 1872 Wyoming, a former gunslinger and his estranged father encounter a ruthless businessman and his posse of thugs.
Director Jon Cassar’s Forsaken is very much a paint by numbers Western, however, the draw (no pun indented) is having father and son Donald and Kiefer Sutherland share the screen. In addition, the supporting cast elevate Brad Mirman’s screenplay with the likes of Demi Moore, Brian Cox and Michael Wincott. Wincott’s Dave Turner, a dangerous principled gun for hire is particularly notable aiming for the heights of Tombstone’s (1993) Kilmer Doc Holiday and underrated Aaron Poole shines as thug Frank Tillman, both actors leave an impression.
Along with Jonathan Goldsmith’s score Cassar’s low-key Western captures the essence of the classics including Shane (1953). And while it’s not a novel as the recent Bone Tomahawk (2015) or as broodingly fun as In a Valley of Violence (2016) it ticks all the American West boxes. Kiefer Sutherland’s John Henry Clayton like Ethan Hawke in the aforementioned film is haunted by the war, Here writer Mirman doesn’t really offer anything new, however, thanks to Kiefer’s simmering cowboy performance he sells the heartache and torment of a repressed killer. The love triangle between Moore’s Mary, her husband and John adds some drama in amongst Cassar’s well staged fights and shoots out as people are force to sell of their land.
Donald Sutherland’s Reverend William Clayton only gets one scene with Cox (who sadly isn’t given much to do) an unscrupulous business man James McCurdy. But the Sutherland’s father and son relationship tensions offer some weighty telling scenes with tragic accidents, war, mother and brother back-story dynamics which hold interest. The preceding peak in the showdown closing act and Winacott and Kiefer cement their gun slinging positions in a satisfying close.
Overall, it doesn’t shake the genre up but is worth watching if only for the Sutherlands, Winacott and Poole’s performance.

A troubled antiques collector inherits a house from his estranged mother only to discover she was devoted to a mysterious cult. As they try to commune with each other a horrifying creature begins to reveal itself.

In the vein of the likes of Ti West’s Innkeepers and House of the Devil, The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh is an old school chiller that works on a psychological level even more so than the aforementioned. Director Rodrigo Gudiño’s slow burner explores lose belief and faith to name a few and takes it’s time to build up the characters. Aaron Poole gives an outstanding subtle performance as Leon Leigh and Vanessa Redgrave’s voice-over throughout as Rosalind Leigh adds a poignant touch.

Gudiño’s camera work gives the impression that Leon is not alone in the house and the camera seemly acts as Rosalind’s spirit at times. The house itself with the interesting location, prop and set design are the real star of the film, this coupled with the music and sound design deliver an atmospheric and immersible eeriness experience. The brief special effects are executed fittingly and add to the creepiness of the production. Rodrigo Gudiño’s offering is wonderfully crafted and his restrained screenplay along with with Pooles’ performance help build the tension of dread nicely.

Overall it’s an original slow burning touching mystery that doesn’t rely on shock tactics to create unease and successfully puts the view in the mind of its main character. Highly recommend.