Archive for September, 2019

Rambo goes on a rescue mission to Mexico to return a kidnapped loved one but a Mexican gang brings the war back to him.

Last Blood is an interesting Rambo instalment, just as you think Adrian Grunberg’s well directed outing is going to be a paint by numbers kidnap flick there’s a major twist on the Taken-like premise. However, while Sylvester Stallone’s and and few other writers flesh out Rambo (reminiscent of First Blood’s characterisation) aside from some old photos it lacks some much needed dialogue nods and throwbacks. Col. Troutman doesn’t really get a mention, his Vietnamese flame, Co Bao, doesn’t get a look in etc. No bandana or hair cut tidbits either. And the theme music is not as punchy as the early outings.

That said, Rambo’s father is mentioned , his mental state is explored and his reliance on medication is touched on. The last twenty minutes as the grizzled veteran dusts off his crossbows to take on the sex traffickers are particularly gory and graphic, appeasing Rambo action fans. There’s gut-wrenching carnage as he picks off a variety of stereotype cartel. Its as hard hitting as it’s predecessor and makes Part II and Rambo III look quite tame in comparison.

Hopefully, Stallone has one more Rambo outing left in him to come full circle, connect the dots with more Vietnam and First Blood, 2, 3 links not just weapon references. We always wanted him home but maybe Rambo is more entertaining back out in a war zone.

Nevertheless, it’s great to see Stallone as Rambo back on the big screen. Recommend.

On a planet a handful of Gelflings begin a rebellion against the Skeksis when they discover a terrifying secret behind their power that threatens their world.

This series prequel to the 1982 movie is admirably inventive and has all the visual splendour of the film while expanding on Jim Henson’s original vision.

These well directed episodes have the same intense feel only with more action and deep colours. There is something underlying menacing which stirs emotions like its predecessor. And just like Dark Crystal, Age of Resistance may be a little too creepy for children (and some adults too!). The series also has the charm of the recent J. R. R. Tolkien adaptations only with puppets.

Sigourney Weaver narrates and it features the talents of Taron Egerton, Anya Taylor-Joy, Nathalie Emmanuel, Simon Pegg, Mark Hamill,Jason Isaacs to name a few. Even though the voices of the original characters are not consistently spot on they’re good enough not to distract too much and that’s really as negative as it gets.

As with the best screen fantasies it has a dreamlike atmosphere and once the characters are established it moves at a brisk pace breaking new ground, introducing new places, creatures and characters not see before in the world Thra.

The advancements in technology mixed with the traditional puppets is breathtakingly groundbreaking. Excellent viewing, highly recommend.

A boy named Harley and his family attends a taping of The Banana Splits TV show. However, when the show is cancelled the stars go on a killing rampage through the studio.

Director Danishka Esterhazy offers viewers The Banana Splits gang, a vest-wearing headstrong mother heroine, over the top gore and Hostel Saw-like torture, mixed with Rob Zombie’s Hell 31 (2016) on a low budget.

Like the recent similar tones of the Puppet Master: Littlest Reich (2018) reboot, Esterhazy film lacks a cinematic look and quality, its straight to home-video feel stops it becoming a cult classic. That’s said, there’s plenty to enjoy. Fleegle and Drooper are particular menacing as the majority of adults are killed off. The child actors are good, actress Dani Kind does her best Linda Hamilton as a Sarah Connor type and Naledi Majola is notable as studio manager Paige.

While this movie is packed with borrowed elements from better films writers Jed Elinoff and Scott Thomas’s story holds up with a few twists, including a programming Frankenstein creator, robotic Banana Splits with a topical A.I. gone wrong reminiscent of Small Soldiers and the recent Child’s Play remake.

For die hard ‘Splits fans Cuckoo is possibly the psychological damaged fiancee (which sets up a sequel) but the ‘head on the wall’ from the original series appears to be omitted. Nevertheless, there’s blood, elaborate deaths throughout the rundown grime ridden studio setting and the showdown with good robot Snorky versus evil Bingo robot is a hoot.

This tone shift will split The Banana Splits fans but old school Banana Splits lovers who like horror should watch even if only for the novel adult tra la la slasher fun.