Archive for September, 2014

The Battery

Posted: September 21, 2014 in FILM REVIEWS/COMMENTS
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IMG_0701.JPGTwo friends keep on the move through remote locations to avoid zombie hordes.

Director, writer and actor Jeremy Gardner delivers a break out zombie film that isn’t heavily reliant on zombie action set ups but captures character and atmosphere.

Where as many low budget zombie films have poor execution or find it hard to meet expectations, trying to be bigger than they are or come across pretentious The Battery knows it’s limits and is self aware. It’s a finely constructed, mesmerising, humanistic zombie road trip.

You care about the characters and follow them on their journey, it’s not dialogue driven but what there is, is humorous, heartfelt and rings true.

Overall, does what it says on the tin delivering a snap shot of two everyday guys surviving during a zombie apocalypse.

Dropped in on a great event – music by Within the War, Pippa Eastman’s fashion design and Burlesque from Chrys Columbine with some great models, organised by Dave Dent. Couple of snaps below I’m sure there’s a huge list of people who made it happen from make up to lighting.

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Chrys Columbine, A. M. Esmonde and Eastman

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Chrys Columbine

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Phebe Harrow and A. M. Esmonde

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Aimee Roddick

IMG_0676.JPGOn a picturesque holiday a group of old old and new friends take a trip to an off limit island and find something thought to be of only fantasy.

With a skimpy dressed cast in amongst the nice scenery and locations there’s blood filled impalement, beheading, hacking, stabbings and a creepy Mermaid. Nymph is a strong horror entry especially during it’s atmospheric night segments as men are enticed by the sounds of the mermaid. The interesting aged Montenegero locations add a different look and feel to the proceedings. At times reminiscent of Dagon, to director Milan Todorovic’s credit it sets the scene with an early killing, then builds up to a claret finale while taking a leaf out of Jaws (1975) book by keeping the ‘monster’ unseen until the final act.

Played straight, the actress Zorana Kostic Obradovic and Mina Sablic’s mermaid steal the show, second to Miodrag Krstovic, a Castro lookalike protagonist and of course there’s Franco Nero in a fitting role as Niko- an old salty sea dog amongst the easy on the eye cast including the notable Natalie Burn, Sofija Rajovic and Kristina Klebe. Yes some cast members sometimes struggle with the English dialogue, accents and the editing and pacing at times is a little off but it adds to the quirky off beat charm that Nymph/Mamula/Killer Mermaid posses.

Overall, this Euro part horror mystery, part slasher flick and campfire tale does what it says on the fantasy horror tin. Entertaining.

 

 

The-Dead-2-The dead are returning to life and attacking the living. An American wind turbine engineer with the help of a local boy attempt a 300 mile journey to reunite with his pregnant Indian girlfriend.

Brothers Howard and Jonathan Ford add an usually unexplored religious angle with the obligatory social commentary subtext making The Dead 2: India as relevant as it’s predecessor. While not as eerie as the first and lacking some logic in both dialogue and decision making, with Nicholas Burton’s (played by Joseph Milson) seemingly six sense knowledge of what’s going on there’s still plenty to enjoy.

The India setting and on location shoot gives part two a realistic gritty, dusty and atmospheric feel. The traditional shambling dead are creepy enough and retain an air of menace with their biting and tearing of flesh, although their white eyes do feel slightly dated and over used. That’s said, there’s more gunplay, more blood and more zombies. With gripping stand out scenes, the crashed car execution, convoy executions, parachute escape and a car going over a cliff to name a few. The directors also deliver some excellent visual moments, a motor cycle blazing across the Indian wastelands, forgotten temples, grand cities, hovering helicopters, jets and burning slums to name a few.

This Ford Brother offering is probably the most grounded undead film since their first outing and Romero’s original trilogy. The director/writers again manage to give their zombie outing scope with a fantastic naturalistic visual style as the engineer and boy go from one village to the next complemented by Imran Ahmad’s music score.

Overall, while not as tension filled and ominous as The Dead, The Dead 2 doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel giving the viewer a much needed solid and serious piece of zombie entertainment. Recommend.