Archive for January, 2014

On their last night out a group of travellers find themselves fighting for survival when an earthquake devastates South America.

Probably due to an abundance of sub-par modern style horrors debatably 2012’s Aftershock is sorely underrated and overlooked. Reminiscent of the character build up that came with Eli Roth’s own Hostel director Nicolás López delivers a hard hitting freely traditionally shot (no found footage here) well executed, gritty disaster film which successfully shocks with its unnerving set ups and exceptional special effects.

The cast are on fine form Natasha Yarovenko as Irina,Lorenza Izzo (Kylie) and Nicolás Martínez and Pollock re notable with with Roth himself putting in a good innings as a nameless dad referred to as Gringo. While it is gratuitous it’s fitting to the story and tone as with the aforementioned as the leads try to survive the earthquakes aftershocks falling buildings, collapsing tunnels and the social unrest which ensues by escapee prisoners before a tsunami hits Chile.

Even with he 35 minute character rounding it’s well paced with fine cinematography by Antonio Quercia and music Manuel Riviero helps it capture some of the original magic which Roth’s first outing did. Even though the ending scene may come as no surprise there are a few twists to peak interest.

While not a horror in the traditional sense with graphic amputations, rape, drugs, a human torch, shooting and murders to name a few, granted it will make the regular viewer wince but it’s well written and sharply directed by López – forget the endless copycat films of the same sub-genre if you rated Hostel and part 2 this is one to watch.

Aftershock on imdb

A team investigating climate change discovers a mysterious organic substance that has the ability to transform both animals and humans into terrifying mutations.
 
This is an entertaining well made eco-horror film in the vein of the Thing (1982). Director Marvin Kren as with zombie flick Rammbock delivers a satisfying and interesting entry into a saturated horror genre with surprisingly effective at times well realized gory effects. There’s some jump moments, old and new school special effects and It benefits from an un-Hollywood quality cast including Gerhard Liebmann as Janek and Edita Malovcic as Tanja but the real star of the show breathtaking Alps setting and H. G Wells-like impressionable provoking ending.
 
While not as tense or physiologically claustrophobic as The Thing (1982) this German language science fiction is adult orientated for those tired of glossy, poorly directed, teen beef and pork dripping tripe.