Rather than start 2012 on a horror note I thought I’d keep things light with my thoughts on Wonder Woman’s doomed TV outing that I was lucky enough to view – certainly from a visual perspective… No matter what I’ll always have the 70’s theme:

Wonder Woman, Wonder Woman.
All the world’s waiting for you,
and the power you possess… Sorry, here is my low down on the 2011 pilot…

Wonder Woman must stop the head of a pharmaceutical company’s illegal experiments for financial gain.

Opening with the horror-stricken images of a boy with bleeding eyes, Wonder Woman quickly moves to a foot chase though the streets. There’s no origin story which some have highly criticised. Personally I’m a exasperated with origin stories, these superhero characters have become a part of pop culture and a back story can seem somewhat unnecessary.

The pilot establishes Wonder Woman as a known face in the real world, a vigilant of sorts, with a reputation for knocking down doors, invading privacy, assaulting people and the videos uploaded to YouTube.

Adrianne Palicki is surprising good as Diana Prince / Wonder Woman, and oddly the promotional pictures for the show didn’t do her justice. She’s tough, rough, sexy and sulky. The plot features a standard Cary Elwes performance as her marketing CEO and Elizabeth Hurley plays the antagonist head of a pharmaceutical company.

It’s quite amusing that (in the world of the pilot) she has become marketable merchandise property and makes a remark that the comic version of her is incorrect with Diana stating that the Wonder Woman doll is insulting and she want’s it redesigned. “These breast are ridiculous.” “Wonder Woman isn’t vulgar.” “Wonder Woman is perfect, perfect t*ts, perfect ass, perfect teeth.” It is apparent that Diana’s/Wonder’s crime fighting technology is funded by Wonder Woman’s merchandising success which is an interesting titbit (no pun intended).

There’s establishing flashback for Diana’s love interest and some good camera work and effects from director Jeffrey Reiner, the contemporary music is dramatic and adds to the tension in the dialogue scenes. David E. Kelley’s story explores briefly the problem of superheroes heavy handiness being unlawful and forever under legal scrutiny.

Wonder Woman is reminiscent of ‘The New Adventures of Superman’ (1993- 1997) although it does have a darker tone and sleeker look. It moves away from Superman’s studio feel and while not particularly true to the comic, Wonder Woman’s shot on location look and Kelley relevant poignant dialogue adds to its allure as much as Palicki’s costume.

The only big action scene is at the 30 minute mark and is the highlight of the pilot with Palicki’s physical prowess and wire-work being most impressive.

Overall, Adrianne Palicki equals Lynda Carter’s incarnation and while not spectacular or highly engrossing it’s no lesser than other mediocre TV productions that have been given a chance and a longer run.
It may have evolved and brought a live action Wonder Woman to another generation but I suppose we may never know –  that is until some else has a stab at bringing DC’s female flag character to life.

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