Archive for October, 2011

 

Hello zombie walking undead eaters! Thank you for all your support.
The dead have returned to life…The world’s focus is on the city of Ravenswood and the once idyllic town of Farmore as platoons and scattered survivors fight the hordes of the dead, unbeknownst one of them holds the key to end the undead’s reign of mayhem. Across the city at a body disposal plant a small group take shifts on the ‘death watch’. Their hopes hinge on the soldiers of Farmore to rescue them. But with no contact for months, no food and surrounded by the dead, have they got what it takes to survive?

Dead PulseWith death at their door, only time can tell…

Click on the link below to read the opening of my walking dead zombie horror Dead Pulse free.  Share the dead

DEAD PULSE OPENING 

Check out the trailer.

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My horror Halloween zombie round up – The Dead, Berlin Undead and World of the Dead: The Zombie Diaries 2…

(see post – Zombies they Creep me out for the full zombie-monty)

World of the Dead: The Zombie Diaries 2 (2011)

A surviving band of UK soldiers and civilians try to survive the flesh- eating living dead.

Opening with a creepy don’t go out there moment – followed by a shock jump scare World of the Dead: The Zombie Diaries 2 is off to a good start despite the laps in logic of the mother holding the camera.

Zombies in the shadows, zombies in night-vision, men in white bio-hazard suits, soldiers on the move going from one death trap from the other. Kevin Gates dialogue is written well but you can’t hep feel that the characters wouldn’t insist on using the military language under the circumstances. In addition, there’s a few lines that feel they’ve been lifted right of from Saving Private Ryan or the Dawn of the Dead remake.

Like its predecessor most of the performances are naturalistic which adds to the tension and believability. Philip Brodie as Maddox is particularly notable and Alix Wilton stands out as Leeann.

There’s Zombie assaults, rape and cleansing kills – it puts the dark side of humanity on display. It’s grim. With the shaky camera, POV galore you can’t but help think directors Michael Bartlett and Gates should have tried and shoot it in a conventual manner. As one of the characters state, “stop f*cking filming and help me.” Bartlett, Gates and cinematographer George Carpenter shine late in the closing when the film switches to the traditional style of filming.

The zombies/ infected are slow and lurking which gives it a foreboding air. This coupled with Pete Renton’s melodic subtle score and the sound effects of whistling wind, eerie moans and groans of the dead add to the creepy experience.

Overall, it’s worth watching especially if you liked the first.

Rammbock: Berlin Undead (2010)


An everyday man Michael is forced to take refuge with a teenage a boy in a room of a flat in Germany after a viral infection spreads rapidly turning the citizens into crazed zombie-like people.

The title Rammbock probably refers to the battering ram that features briefly in one scene. Spain had REC, France Le Horde and UK 28 Days Later – this is a German take on a virus epidemic in which we see the population of Berlin turn rabid.

There’s a crazy old woman that goes nuts within a similar setting as REC. Just as everything seems all to familiar director Marvin Kren throws in a little curve ball, a suicide, a new character or adds a little relationship drama amongst the mayhem to keep things on track.

However, even with it’s very short running time there’s a too much shaky camera work, this aside the performances and gritty look of the characters feel authentic. Actor Michael Fuith gives a first rate anti- gloss performance which complements the on location shoot. The flats looking down onto one courtyard take a leaf from Hitchcock’s very own Rear Window.The music has a dream like melodic quality reminiscent of 28 Days Later and is used sparingly.

When Benjamin Hessler screenplay moves from the one room to another there is some fine suspense created. Although how they repel the infected in closing act is a little anticlimactic – yet it’s quickly redeemed by an effective a poignant closing.

Overall, it’s grim grey and efficiently made but with the virus angle already feeling worn you may find yourself wanting to see a film with some shambling dead instead.

The Dead (2010)

The dead are returning to life and attacking the living. After surviving a plane crash American Air Force Engineer Lieutenant Brian Murphy teams up with a local army Sgt. Daniel Dembele and they try to stay alive in dead infested war-torn Africa.
The zombie market has been saturated with countless sub-par films. There have been a few welcomed additions- the Dawn of the Dead remake, cross genre Australian film Undead, 28 Days virus flicks, comedies including Shaun of the Dead, Zombieland and actioner Le Horde. I personally I like sober zombie films and The Dead is probably the most grounded undead film since Romero’s original trilogy. Director and writer team Howard and Jonathan Ford manage to give their zombie offering scope, emotion and anxiety that arguably lacked in Land and Survival of the Dead respectively.
With the competent naturalistic visual style reminiscent of Monsters, less is also more in The Dead’s case. Imran Ahmad’s music score complements the on screen deeds and while not particularly memorable it is subtle and effective enough.
The African setting is a welcomed change, the on location shoot gives it an eerie real feel. The costume design appears authentic. Dan Rickard’s special effects and Max Van De Banks’ makeup are first rate, bones sticking out of legs, wounds, bites and the dead getting hit and shot at are executed perfectly. The traditional shambling sluggish dead are creepy enough and retain an air of menace.
Due to the constraints of the story there’s little dialogue. That said, what there is rings true and the characters are given time to develop. The acting all round is of a high standard, with fitting performances from both leads Rob Freeman and Prince David Oseia.
My only grumble is that there’s been so many zombie films lately it mars the freshness that The Dead delivers. Intentional or unintentional as with Romero’s films there is indeed a social commentary running though The Dead and the African setting is debatably no accident. The Dead may lack comradely wordplay but it doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel.
Overall, The Dead gives the viewer a much needed solid piece of realistic zombie entertainment. Recommend.

Love them or hate them they make loads of money – part Blair Witch Project, part REC, part Ghost Hunters and Most Haunted. It has spawned two sequels already – not it’s not Maniac Cop or Evil Dead its… Paranormal Activity. Whhooooaaa Spooky!
As it’s Halloween weekend I thought I’d put together my findings on the films that caused a 1000 manics and wannabe film makers to run-around their houses with the lights off, their night vision cameras in hand and pull objects supernaturally on piano wire or fishing gut. Unlike Blair Witch copies the amateurs can emulate PA in doors without having to leave the comfort of their own home – no cold, no damp and no snot running from their nose… Here are my thoughts on the films that launched a thousand screams and  possibly made youreconsider home security cameras.

Paranormal Activity (2007) 

A couple becomes increasingly disturbed by Paranormal Activity in their home, wow sounds great? The films strong points is that it contains some quality direction by Oren Pel, fantastic plausible natural acting, some skilfully thought out camera work and effective sound effects.
However, it’s simply another story told through the eyes of a character, in this case Micah’s camera lens. In a nutshell builds up to a big scare at the end (depending on which version you see of the film).
It’s over ten years since the ‘The Blair Witch Project’ used the camera point of view and while Paranormal Activity looks good, is well executed and constructed, it goes over the same old formula. If you enjoyed and were scared by Blair Witch you’ll love Paranormal Activity.

That said, if you thought Blair Witch was hyped and shock-less on it’s release and you have a preference for REC or Cloverfield, you’ll be disappointed.
If you’re a big fan of these point of view camera films, and you have to see another this probably isn’t it but if you like TV’s Most Haunted, Ghost Hunters, Ghost Adventures and the like this may do the trick.

A couple become increasingly disturbed by Paranormal Activity in their home that maybe linked to their an infant son. His teenage half-sister against their father wish tries to uncover the truth.
This sequel /prequel contains some quality direction by Tod Williams who takes over the reigns for this instalment. With the usage of static security camera’s and some thought out camera work it gives P2 a slight edged and a grander film quality over it’s predecessor. However, the jump out sound moments aside the sound effects and design appear less creepy this time around.
The whole cast are fantastic. The acting is plausible and natural by the leads, notably Molly Ephraim who plays the inquisitive everyday daughter and Vivis Cortez as the ‘help’. Those with young children and pets will be left a little more disturbed by this follow up and fans of the first will be pleased by Katie and Micah’s return.
Sadly, for the most part its purpose is to build up to a big scare at the end. Again it’s simply another story told through the eyes of a camera lenses and the writers inject some unnecessary connections and exposition to the goings on which takes away some of the mysteries random edge.
It’s nearly 15 years since the ‘The Blair Witch Project’ used the camera point of view and while Paranormal Activity 2 looks better than the first it goes over the same old formula.
If you enjoyed and were scared by 1st you’ll be blown away by Paranormal Activity 2. Yet, old school haunted house fans maybe left less chilled and thrilled.

Two girls befriend an invisible entity who resides in their home and their mothers partner sets out to film the strange goings on.
The two leads from one and two Sprague Grayden and Katie Featherston reprise their roles briefly. Part 3 opens with a brief insight of the events of Paranormal Activity 1 and 2. It quickly moves to 1988 (you view the contents of some missing tapes) to a time when the sisters Katie (Chloe Csengery) and (Jessica Tyler Brown) Kristi Rey are young.
This prequel directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman Paranormal 3 is technically well filmed, exceeding the likes of Blare Witch in both look and sound. Because of the 88 setting, there’s lots of nice touches, the sets, the VHS imperfections, date/time stamps and noise of the camera zooming.
Like its predecessor, there are good naturalistic performances. Sceptic Mom Julie played by Lauren Bittner and boyfriend Dennis – Christopher Nicholas Smith are more than adequate. Dennis’ character is as likable as Micah from the first. Video obsessed he makes a swivelling camera from a fan to the annoyance of his wife.

Old ground is trod, characters filming themselves, waking up late at night, creepy images, bangs, shaking rooms, noises and so. There is nothing more creepy than children talking to unseen entities or babysitters getting scared.
You follow the characters on their journey as they investigate and interrogate the video footage and strange goings on in their new house. There’s a few stand out moments, the hair pulling and balloon bedroom part complete with blanket flying at the camera. The scene where Dennis’ friend Randy experiences the ghostly goings on is a highlight.
Paranormal Activity 3 is not a horror in the traditional sense- if you enjoy these camera point of view chillers and was scared by first two this will possibly exceed expectations. That said, it’s not as clever as part 2 in its narrative intertwining.
Ultimately once again it builds up to a big snapping scare, its more of the same. Nevertheless, it still manages to suck you in an be intriguing – why I’ll never know.
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For anyone else outside the UK here’s the 1985 Scotch video tapes famous for the slogan “Re-record, not fade away, re-record, not fade away…” Happy Halloween!
It could have been a remake of The Thing (1982) a remake of The Thing from Another World (1951).  Universal saw sense and have made a prequel from the makers who brought the effective Dawn of the Dead remake – and as a bonus it doesn’t mess about with the timeline. It is set in the 1980’s. Phew.

John Carpenter’s The Thing is one of the most underrated horrors ever and remake for that matter. Thankfully in recent years it’s gained and even larger following spawning video games and figures. I’ve always loved it – darn you McTiernan ripping off the opening shot in Predator.

More importantly its prompted this 2011 film and considering it’s not a remake its oddly also named ‘The Thing’. So here are my husky thoughts on The Thing, the one with Mary Winstead, the star of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World and Die Hard 4.0 and The Thing – the one with Kurt “Snake” Plissken Russell just so you can tell the difference…
The Thing (2011)
It is 1982, after a signal is investigated in Antartica a team accidentally find a body and ship. A team of researchers are dispatched to assist and they soon find they’ve discovered something alien and deadly.

From the opening cinematographer Michel Abramowicz delivers an opening of a sweeping snow-landscape as a yellow tractor ploughs across the ice and snow with the familiar beats of the originals score. Bearded Norwegian talk in their native dialogue and you feel you’re in good hands from the outset.
Although there are two females roles Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Kate gives it that Alien- esque dynamic with a prominent male cast but over all the look and feel is that of The Thing and it feels like a true prequel.
The recreation of the sets and the 80’s music add to the fan-boy fun and Marco Beltrami score excellently reworks Ennio Morricone original track which packs it’s own punches and chills.

It’s a dark film with lots of shadows possibly more so that it’s predecessor what adds to the claustrophobic atmosphere. It’s also bloodier, and gorier with an equally fantastic autopsy scene.
There’s no getting away from comparing Directors Matthijs van Heijningen Jr.’s Thing to the original classic. That said, for new comers watching it cold it works as a stand alone film – as a prequel to the masses its a joy.
The team are equipped bio researchers which adds extra dynamic and pace to the story, like the viewer some of the characters have equal knowledge of what The Thing creature is doing early on like its audience who have already seen Carpenters classic. However, that fact the characters are up to speed on Alien creatures purpose it takes some of the everyday down to earth person handling a situation, learning more as they go along away.

There’s some effective tension and there’s a great set piece on a helicopter. Due credit to writer Eric Heisserer and Ronald D. Moore, the Norwegian dialogue adds to the realism and attention to detail. As distrust builds the story becomes even more engrossing. There’s too
much CGI nevertheless there are some nice touches involving arm braces and tooth fillings thrown into the mix and Heijningen Jr. Handles the mix of splitting heads contorted bodies and faces perfectly while creating a great sci-fi horror ride.

The sound is wonderful with familiar moaning, the tentacles flaying noise and eerie screams galore. These complement the practical and computer effects. There are some discrepancies but none that detract or couldn’t be arguably accounted for.
The acting is more than adequate aided by a solid script. There are some notable performances including Ulrich Thomse’s Doctor Sander and Jonathan Walker as Colin. Winstead really carries the film and does it surprisingly well -as a side note she’s as moody and likable as Kurt’s MacReady.
There’s not a joke in sight, it’s serious. It’s a very fast paced film with enough surprises to keep it fresh while paying homage at the same time. The closing act is bloated but arguably so was The Thing’s 1982. But like its classic counterpart all is forgiven with its great epilogue.
Overall, semi-perfect replication -like  The Thing organism itself.

The Thing (1982)
The Thing [Blu-ray]An atmospheric understated sci-fi at it best. I’ll never understand how Carpenter lost the lustre in some of the other film he made, nevertheless, his Thing is one of his best movies and also once of the best sci-fi movies ever. Despite being based on the same source material (before remakes were popular) the thing has a look and feel of it’s own and is very different from its 50’s counterpart.
The isolated setting, the astounding cinematography and scenery creates intrigue; drawing you in from the very beginning. It’s a perfect horror/sci-fi cocktail of Ennio Morricone’s haunting foreboding score, Rob Bottin and Stan Winston (dog effect) benchmark practical effects (which are unsurpassed) Carpenters claustrophobic set ups and Bill Lancaster screenplay.
It’s rare that every single actor is exceptional and supplied with effective dialogue. All the cast from Kurt Russell to Wilford Brimley as Blair are all captivating, great casting by Anita Dann. The characters have their own issues and as the paranoia sets in relationships are forged and other broken, building to a bold and satisfying conclusion.
This is more than just a cult film with a ‘monster’ hiding in warm places surrounded by snow, it’s a finely tuned science fiction horror masterpiece.
Notorious for being banned in the UK for many years as a ‘Video Nasty’ Zombi 2 a.k.a Zombie and Zombie Flesheaters brought Italian director Lucio Fulci world cult status. Although it’s sequels dissipated into dust Zombie found a following on grainy VHS and DVD plagued problems on its varying editions.
US company Blue Underground have released a new all singing and dancing Blu- ray edition. The two discs are a little marketing ploy but that said what they contain is zombie horror priceless, especially if you’re a fan. However, UK company, Arrow’s 2 disc Blu-ray offering is even better with arguably as good extras.
There’s the familiar commentary with Ian McCulloch and the usual regurgitated promotional material. But on Disc two there is a wealth of new interviews from cast and crew (in HD) and horror cleric Guillermo del Toro giving his thoughts on one of his most beloved films. But the star of this edition is the film itself lovingly restored by the Italian facility LVR to possibly the best it can be (*until the Arrow UK version comes along – probably). Edit Nov 2012 –
*Arrow Blu-ray release has the original mono and while not having the 5.1 sound of option still trumps the Blue Underground version with a far superior picture, and does contain new commentaries and an array of new extras. Arrow is my preferred version to date.

Underground’s like Arrow’s print is clean, defect free with the high resolution bringing out the blood and gores glorious colours. The great thing is that the skin tones look much more natural and even more so in Arrow’s version. Overall, either packages or both are a zombie must have and a worthy upgrade.
My thoughts on the film haven’t changed but if you don’t know much about Zombie here it goes…
After an incident in New York bay a reporter and a scientist’s daughter travel to an Island aided by two locals. However, the dead are returning to life on the Island… The zombies long for human flesh and the pair find themselves in hopeless situation.
Not to be confused with Bruno Mattei’s Zombie Creeping Flesh (1980) (a.k.a Virus, Hell of the Living Dead to name a few) Lucio Fulci’s Zombie Flesheaters (1979) is far superior. Conflicting reports say that a draft was written prior to Dawn of the Dead (a.ka. Zombi) (this maybe unfounded) but most horror fans are aware that the name Flesheaters was changed to Zombi 2 and a new ending was tagged on to cash in on Romero success. You could argue that the talked about soundtrack is as intrusive as Dawn of the Dead music themes and that the eye scene is better than Argento’s vocational displays.
Comparisons to other movies aside Zombie Flesheaters (1979) suffers from Lucio Fulci’s own trappings – including badly written dialogue, choppy editing and bad dubbing. That said, there are very few directors that capture atmosphere you can taste. Fulci’s cinematic look is heightened by Giorgio Cascio and Fabio Frizzi’s excellent eerie and foreboding score.

The supporting cast are mostly sufficient, leads Tisa Farrow and Ian McCulloch are more than adequate, note worthy is Richard Johnson as Dr. David Menard. Notorious for the shark/zombie scene Flesheaters is so much more, Fulci creates some unmatched ambiance, the visuals are as lingering as the dead, dusty paths, an old Spanish cemetery, darkness lit up by Molotov cocktails and so on.

Zombie Flesheaters with all its low-budget faults is a creepy, slow paced, effective zombie film.
The discs in detail:
DISC 1:
• Audio Commentary with Star Ian McCulloch and Diabolik Magazine Editor Jason J. Slater
• Theatrical Trailers
• TV Spots
• Radio Spots
• Poster & Still Gallery
• Guillermo del Toro Intro
DISC 2 All in 1080p!:
• “Zombie Wasteland” – Interviews with Stars Ian McCulloch, Richard Johnson & Al Cliver, and Actor/Stuntman Ottaviano Dell’Acqua (22:19)
• “Flesh Eaters on Film” – Interview with Co-Producer Fabrizio De Angelis (9:39)
• “Deadtime Stories” – Interviews with Co-Writers Elisa Briganti and (Uncredited) Dardano Sacchetti (14:30)
• “World of the Dead” – Interviews with Cinematographer Sergio Salvati and Production & Costume Designer Walter Patriarca (16:29)
• “Zombi Italiano” – Interviews with Special Make-Up Effects Artists Gianetto De Rossi & Maurizio Trani and Special Effects Artist Gino De Rossi (16:34 )
• “Notes on a Headstone” – Interview with Composer Fabio Frizzi (7:25)
• “All in the Family” – Interview with Antonella Fulci (6:08)
• “Zombie Lover” – Award-Winning Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro talks about one of his favorite films (9:37)

ARROW’S SPECIAL FEATURES:

– Brand new high definition restoration of the original negative with optional English and Italian opening/closing sequences

– Optional English SDH subtitles for English Audio, newly translated English subtitles for Italian audio
– Original Mono 2.0 Italian and English audio

– Audio commentary with screenwriter Elisa Briganti moderated by Calum Waddell

– Audio commentary with Fulci biographer Stephen Thrower and horror expert Alan Jones .

– UK exclusive introduction to the film from Ian McCulloch

– ALIENS, CANNIBALS AND ZOMBIES: A TRILOGY OF ITALIAN TERROR: Actor Ian McCulloch remembers his three classics of Latin horror lunacy – ZOMBIE FLESH EATERS, CONTAMINATION and ZOMBI HOLOCAUST

– FROM ROMERO TO ROME: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE ITALIAN ZOMBIE FILM: Veteran Fulci screenwriters Dardano Sacchetti (THE BEYOND) and Antonio Tentori (CAT IN THE BRAIN), celebrated UK critic Kim Newman and filmmakers Luigi Cozzi (CONTAMINATION), Ruggero Deodato (CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST), Russ Streiner (NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD) plus many more share memories of the genesis of corpse-crunching cinema – from Romero’s early templates to the gory glory days of Fulci and his many successors.

– THE MEAT MUNCHING MOVIES OF GINO DE ROSSI: The special effects magician behind many Italian splatter classics talks about his most famous gore-drenched greats – and shows props from many plasma-packed masterworks – including ZOMBIE FLESH-EATERS, CITY OF THE LIVING DEAD, THE HOUSE BY THE CEMETERY, CANNIBAL FEROX, BURIAL GROUND and PIRANHA II.

– MUSIC FOR A FLESH-FEAST: Composer Fabio Frizzi – Live Q&A from the Glasgow Film Theatre
– ZOMBIE FLESH EATERS – FROM SCRIPT TO SCREEN: Dardano Sacchetti shows key pages from his original ISLAND OF THE LIVING DEAD screenplay.

– Trailers and TV spots

– Collector’s booklet featuring brand new writing on the film by Fulci biographer Stephen Thrower, a new interview with star Olga Karlatos by Calum Waddell, a history of Zombie Flesh Eaters and the BBFC by Craig Lapper, one of the board’s senior examiners, and extracts of the original ‘Nightmare Island’ 1978 script including unfilmed, alternate, and more gory sequences as well as a Lucio Fulci CV compiled by Jay Slater

– Limited Edition Exclusive artworks by Graham Humphreys

My Vampire horror action drama Terminus had it’s first UK showing this October.

Chris Regan of the Movie Bar, Brighton called Terminus , “existential vampire epic successfully crosses violent supernatural hijinks with an arthouse aesthetic to produce a new take on a worn-out genre.”

It had some feedback on Twitter that included a nice comment, “Liked it alot! Nice meditative feel and slick visuals, very interesting take on the genre.”

For me it’s great that Terminus found an audience outside the US and Director Sean P. Parsons’ work is finding a wider audience. You can read the Q and A session about the making of Terminus here
and watch the trailer of Terminus here.

The 45 minute film is available exclusively on Amazon to US customers only.
I’m a sucker for zombie films (see post – Zombies they Creep me out), from Junk: Shiryô-gari (2000) to Dawn of the Dead and a few effective low budgeters in between including Severed (2005), Devil’s Playground (2010) and Autumn (2009). But there’s a tonne of DTV tripe that I wont even name. In any case I’ve been following The Dead’s production for a long-time and with the film maker ethos reminiscent of  the makers of Monsters (2010) i.e on location low budget, with a big budget look- here’s my thoughts on The Dead…
The dead are returning to life and attacking the living. After surviving a plane crash American Air Force Engineer Lieutenant Brian Murphy teams up with a local army Sgt. Daniel Dembele and they try to stay alive in dead infested war-torn Africa.
The zombie market has been saturated with countless sub-par films. There have been a few welcomed additions- the Dawn of the Dead remake, cross genre Australian film Undead, 28 Days virus flicks, comedies including Shaun of the Dead, Zombieland and actioner Le Horde. I personally I like sober zombie films and The Dead is probably the most grounded undead film since Romero’s original trilogy. Director and writer team Howard and Jonathan Ford manage to give their zombie offering scope, emotion and anxiety that arguably lacked in Land and Survival of the Dead respectively.
With the competent naturalistic visual style reminiscent of Monsters, less is also more in The Dead’s case. Imran Ahmad’s music score complements the on screen deeds and while not particularly memorable it is subtle and effective enough.
The African setting is a welcomed change, the on location shoot gives it an eerie real feel. The costume design appears authentic. Dan Rickard’s special effects and Max Van De Banks’ makeup are first rate, bones sticking out of legs, wounds, bites and the dead getting hit and shot at are executed perfectly. The traditional shambling sluggish dead are creepy enough and retain an air of menace.
Due to the constraints of the story there’s little dialogue. That said, what there is rings true and the characters are given time to develop. The acting all round is of a high standard, with fitting performances from both leads Rob Freeman and Prince David Oseia.
My only grumble is that there’s been so many zombie films lately it mars the freshness that The Dead delivers. Intentional or unintentional as with Romero’s films there is indeed a social commentary running though The Dead and the African setting is debatably no accident. The Dead may lack comradely wordplay but it doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel.
Overall, The Dead gives the viewer a much needed solid piece of realistic zombie entertainment. Recommend.
There was a time that people laughed when I told them I bought things on the internet… I was told that DVD wouldn’t take off, that Blu-ray was no match for HD-DVD and I was signed as a test case for Kindle when some people thought it was used for consuming soup.

That’s just a few examples, but nobody is perfect – I have been wrong about things, Sodastream, those fizzy bubbles just can’t seem to stick and Velcro pants- they seemed like a great idea at the time.

I very rarely endorse, that said, I’m a supporter of Indie film maker David Paul Baker, Classic Horror Campaign the Wales Ape and Monkey Sanctuary.

But I thought it was important I introduce you  to Oxicomics. Oxicomics is a digital platform for comics, they started out of the love for comics. As you may know back before the iPad, digital comics started out as apps for iPhone – which injected new life into comics, allowing seasoned readers and a whole new generation of comic lovers to enjoy on a different medium.

I was lucky enough to be in contact with Morten F. Thomsen and to be a part of Oxicomics launch this year and the comic adaptation of my novel Blood Hunger was hosted by Oxicomics.
So if you love comics and want to be a part of something expanding an innovative
please consider contributing to their fundraising campaign.http://www.indiegogo.com/project/widget/16040
In addition, if you happen to be a developer on iOS, Android, Javascript, graphics designer or Drupal/PHP/Ruby on Rails developer with some spare time – Oxicomics could always use your help!They do it for the love – so that writers, artists and readers can reap the reward.

The Vindicator (1986)

A scientist working on a top secret experiment is killed in an explosion but the corporation that funds his experiments transforms him into a robot.

A resurrection science fiction film that despite being a B-low budget affair has a grander 80’s film quality feel thanks to some gritty, raw and rough round the edges special effects.

Richard Cox and cult favourite Pam Grier are watchable and some performances are above average. However, they are counter balanced by some very shoddy supporting actors. Edith Rey and David Preston’s dialogue is flawed, yet their story fairs better exploring some moral dilemmas.

Although it predates Robocop (1987) I remember the main draw to watch it was because of The Terminator (1984). That said, the Vindicator shares more with Frankenstein and The Wraith (1986).

Jean-Claude Lord’s Vindicator was more appealing watch in the 1980’s. It has some nice visual moments but little more. The certain charm it held in my mind since 1986 was really just warm nostalgia – as on revisiting The Vindicator it’s not as entertaining or fast paced as I remembered it.

While fun at the time, in retrospect – for comparable curiosity only.