Archive for October, 2010

It’s that time of year, my favourite time, Halloween. As a child a few of the influences that hooked me to write this genre were ‘horror nasty’ video sleeves and the elaborate cover-art of horror novels. I’ve put together a selection of thoughts of some great horror movies (and there are countless others), perfect for that cold Autumn night, including Halloween and The Shining which in my opinion are horror must see.
Case 39 (2009)
Going against typecast Renée Zellweger plays a social worker who takes in an allegedly abused child, Lilith after her parents try to kill her. However, the little girl may not be all she seems, reminiscent of the Orphan (2009) and borrowing heavily from the Omen and it’s remake, Case 39 is an enjoyable horror yarn.
Aside from a realistic Hornet scene and CGI face changes, thankfully Case 39’s director Christian Alvart avoids using noticeable dodgy visual effects. For the first 40 minutes or so it’s a strong creepy drama which then turns into a psychological horror in the latter half.
There’s nothing new in Ray Wright story, however, what keeps you watching is child actor Jodelle Ferland and Zellweger, who both give great performances. Both Ian McShane and Adrian Lester turn up with American accents and are great at grounding the bizarre occurrences. Also Bradley Cooper of A-Team fame plays a small notable role as a child psychologist and love interest.
While it’s not the most original horror drama it is effective with some genuine well executed creepy moments. Great late night viewing.
Rec (2007)
A Spanish female TV reporter, Ángela Vidal (Manuela Velasco) and her cameraman Manu (Ferran Terraza) cover the night-shift at the local fire-station but thing goes awry when they go on a call to a building that becomes quarantined.
Taking style of The Blair Witch Project (1999) to a more fitting effective and aesthetics level and inspiring big budgeter Cloverfield (2008), Rec is creatively directed/written by Jaume Balagueró and Luis Berdejo.
The film is seen purely from the point of view of the cameras and at times the shock factor is high. The film is packed with excellent practical effects, great sound and first rate makeup. This with the on location setting and lighting create and eerie atmosphere.

The acting is superb (and the unnecessary remake Quarantine (2008) is pale in comparison) as Manuela leads a cast of authentic looking firemen into a building as the infection spreads making it’s victims zombie-like. The supporting cast of occupants are equally as good, the acting is superb especially in the smaller quieter segments as they are interviewed by Ángela’s character and when they find out they are trapped in the building.

The action, suspense and fear builds up to a crescendo as the truth of the outbreak is revealed. With some jump scares and a surprise ending it’s a perfect horror ride.
Rec 2 (2009
Continuing right where Rec (2007) left off, a SWAT team outfitted with video cameras are sent into a virus infected quarantined apartment to assist in retrieving some blood samples.
The same writer/directors Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza are back on board with an extra writer Manu Díez in the sequel to the excellent Spanish horror flick. It’s more of the same, dark corridors, frantic Point of View camera work, blood gore and mayhem.
Rec 2 wastes no time of getting back into the building where the out-break started. It is an entertaining horror piece as the SWAT team are picked off one by one, but it lacks the character development of the first and feels more of a ride than gripping. That said, the acting is first rate, Jonathan Mellor’s Dr. Owen is notable and Manuela Velasco returns.
There’s some clever story telling that inter-loops the goings on and also links it to the first Rec. However, there is less focus on the virus/zombie and the screen-play centres on a more biblical and parasite theme which takes the story in new directions. Still, it’s just as fresh and a chilling as Rec and Rec 2 comes full circle in the closing shots.
Overall a great entry that has inevitably spawned a third and a Quarantine2.
28 Days Later… (2002)
Danny Boyle’s 28 Day Later is the best mindless human being film since Romero’s zombie movies. It’s an exceptional horror film that follows a handful of survivors after an incurable virus spreads throughout the UK.
From the opening frantic scene that is quickly followed by the quiet empty deserted streets of London, you know your watching something different and fresh. Without detriment to the story there’s lots of gore and bloodshed. However, there’s also a lot of psychological terror happening and subtle character touches that make you feel for these people.
Outstanding writing by Alex Garland and a pulsating chilling score John Murphy adds to 28’s perfect tension, atmosphere and tone. The casting by Gail Stevens is faultless, it includes Cillian Murphy, Brendan Gleeson and Christopher Eccleston in their best roles to-date. This is director Danny Boyle’s unnerving masterpiece.
A perfect gritty horror, with a realistic scary premise. A must see.
Halloween (1978)
John Carpenters 1978 textbook horror slasher film.
What make this different to many other babysitter stalker films is the production value, Carpenters direction and score that reeks of dread. Perfect leads include, heavy weight Donald Pleasence and ever reliable Jamie Lee Curtis as they try to out wit an escaped psychotic murderer.
Halloween is a well produced basic, yet essential horror that contains very little nudity or blood for this type of genre. What maybe a little tame for gore hungry audiences of today, it still remains defining archetype horror film, as without the masked Michael Myers there wouldn’t be many of the horror’s there are on your shelf right now.
A must see for any horror fan.
The Shining (1980)
A caretaker is isolated with his family in a hotel for the winter season, however they are not alone and the past guests and staff spirits still live on putting the caretaker, his wife and son in grave danger.
What can I say about Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining’ that hasn’t already been said? I watched the uncut 146 minute version which only reinforced the fact that it is one of the best, if not the greatest tension driven, psychological horror films that has been made.
Thankfully Kubrick doesn’t follow Kings ‘The Shining’ novel to the letter, or we have the hedged animals coming to life and an explosive ending, while grand it would have lost the reality and realism that Kubrick creates.
Jack Nicholson’s antics, Shelley Duvall’s fear, Danny Lloyd’s performance (one of the few child leads that isn’t annoying) is first-rate as Danny. Veteran and voice of Hong Kong Phooey, Scatman Crothers is superb and the array of actors small but memorable parts including, Bladerunners Joe Turkel as Lloyd the Bartender and Barry Nelson as Manger, Stuart Ullman.
It’s not the novel, Kubrick’s the Shining one of the most impressive horror films ever made and on so many levels.
The nights are getting darker, chilly and it’s that spooky time of year as the winter rolls in. This is Halloween!
Halloween appears to be celebrated far more in the USA and where I have been welcomed a one of their own. But there’s plenty of horror to go around. Every year more and more people are enbracing horror and the film and book indusrty are taking notice and as a result horror is being taken more seriously. It’s encouranging! 
It’s been an extremely busy 24 months for myself and the anticipation has been immense. As a bonus I’ve met some of my hero’s. It’s been novels and film projects. Photo shoots, celebrities and more. I hope my fellow horror fans out there will enjoy what I’ve created to date.
In addition, to getting projects on screen and books published there’s my free horror webshow with the delighful Sophia Disgrace here and on youtube.
Over the months I’ve been spurred on, not just by the usual suspects that you expect but the people I’ve met
 on Facebook and especially twitter. I’ve met some great models, actresses, photographers, artists and authors/ writers but more importantly I discovered some real horror fans with passion.

So I’d like to use this Halloween blog to say a big thank you.

Below is The Breathing Dead horror round up.What we’ve accomplished. Spread the word and “Hammer Horror Home.”

 

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Christopher Smith, (born 1970) is not just a British film director but also a great writer, while not celebrated as the likes of the comparable Neil Marshall or the now mainstream Christopher  Nolan, Smith certainly deserves his place in directing Brit history. Here’s my lowdown on his fabulous quad of films 2004 -2010…
Creep (2004)
Franka Potente is party goer Kate, after she misses her last train, she is pursued by a deformed crazy and has to fight for survival in the London underground system.
British films had played it safe for a jolly good while with costume dramas, romantic comedies and gangster flicks. However, the UK have started dishing out a few original horror gems in recent years, Dog Soldiers, Descent etc. Writer/ director Christopher Smith (who went on to make Severance) with a small budget gives the viewer an effective, interesting chiller.
There’s no bad acting here, the actors deliver the goods with a limited dialogue driven script. To build up the tension Smith utilises the underground, music and sound to full effect. He creates a genuine creepy atmosphere, the lighting is fantastic and the gore effects are note worthy.
The quirky small cast that Potente encounters are believable and the killer who dwells in the underground is one of the better original killers in a longer while.
The film is very bloody at times and was quite shocking in 2004. Creep remains a strong claustrophobic and underrated horror.
 
Severance (2006)
 
Imagine your on an office bonding weekend with your boss and colleagues, with all the typical office banter and goings on but you then get stuck in the middle of nowhere and your colleagues start to get killed off- this is the basic premise to the highly recommended film Severance.
Severance is laced with genuine humour, mostly supplied by Steve played by Danny Dyer and Tim McInnerny as clueless office boss Richard. The supporting cast give memorable and plausible performances that highlight underlying relationships making the characters likable. The character build up pays off as you find yourself rooting for their survival. The bad guys are menacing and there is plenty of realistic gore.
This very enjoyable, ironic, balanced, horror/comedy written and directed by Christopher Smith remains witty and shocking throughout.
Highly recommended whether you work in an office or not.
 
 
 
Triangle (2009)
Written and directed by Christopher Smith, lead Melissa George gives a
justifiably odd but mesmerising performance as Jess, as her and her
friends are forced to abandon their sailing boat and take refugee on an
ocean liner.
Some may find the story frustrating, however, it’s a taught mind-bending thriller, about how your actions can change your life.
Triangle is an interesting grounded and emotionally driven chiller that explores time travel, doppelgangers and choices.
George effortlessly carries the weight of the film on her shoulders and the small supporting cast are more than effective. Smith’s direction is superb, with few locations, as the film mostly takes place on the marvellously dressed ‘Ghost ship’, his angles and use of movement ensure the viewer is never left uninterested and credit must go to Robert Humphreys’ photography direction. Stuart Gazzard’s editing is fantastic and key in making the interloped story work. Christian Henson’s score is the icing on the cake and adds to the eerie, creepy atmosphere.
Triangle gives the viewer a lot to think about and ponder over well
after the credits roll.
Black Death (2010)
Two British directors and writers really standout for me in recent years, Neil Marshall (Dog Soldiers, Descent and Doomsday) and Christopher Smith (Creep, Triangle and Severance). Smith’s latest offering has it the mark with a blend of swords, Catholicism and Wicker released the same year Neil Marshall’s well advertised Centurion, which on first viewing was sadly average.

Set in 1348 the Black Death is at it peak, however, one village appears to be immune to the plague. Ulric (Sean Bean) devoted Christian enlist the help of a Monk (Eddie Redmayne) to lead him and his men through dangerous lands to this unholy village where it is said the dead are being brought back to life.

With marshes, fog and mists across the lands it oozes atmosphere. The gritty realistic sets and settings are note worthy, everything looks authentic and aged, perfect for first outbreak of bubonic plague. There’s some great practical effects, cadavers, dismemberment’s and blood. The flights are finely choreographed and swordplay is raw and relentless as limbs are hacked off.

The latter part of the film slows down, building tension in the seemingly safe village, Smith’s develops the eerie strangeness of the rural superbly, reminiscent of the Wickerman (1973 & 2006), In the Name of the Rose (1986) and The Village (2004).

Although in fear of being typecast as another chain armoured soldier Bean gives a passionate and gripping performance, and newcomer Redmayne plays the confounded monk Osmund’s admirably. The supporting cast, even though another band mercenaries are memorable and the characters are developed. Comedy actor Tim McInnerny is satisfactory in an unusual serious role as the village head. There’s a notable cameo by David Warner as The Abbot. However, it’s Carice van Houten who steals the show as Langiva the striking necromancer.

There’s a little too much shaky hand held camera work at times, that aside the cinematography is first rate. Dario Poloni screenplay is the icing on the cake, as the dialogue feels authentic and unforced, compared to the aforementioned other period piece. It explores religious beliefs, faith, witch hunts, occultism and much more.

With low expectation’s for another period piece, I was pleasantly surprised by Smith’s vision. Certainly not perfect or the grandest film; however, it’s a gripping medieval, satanic mystery action that has a nice original twist at the end.

Two British directors and writers really standout for me in recent years, Neil Marshall (Dog Soldiers, Descent and Doomsday) and Christopher Smith (Creep, Triangle and Severance). Smith’s latest offering has left its mark with a blend of swords, Catholicism and Wicker. It was released the same year as Neil Marshall’s well advertised (on DVD & Blu-Ray) Centurion, sadly both missed a good theatrical run.

Here are my thoughts on them both and why one has an edge over the other…Black Death (2010)

Set in 1348 the Black Death is at it peak, however, one village appears to be immune to the plague. Ulric (Sean Bean) devoted Christian enlist the help of a Monk (Eddie Redmayne) to lead him and his men through dangerous lands to this unholy village where it is said the dead are being brought back to life.

With marshes, fog and mists across the lands it oozes atmosphere. The gritty realistic sets and settings are note worthy, everything looks authentic and aged, perfect for first outbreak of bubonic plague. There’s some great practical effects, cadavers, dismemberment’s and blood. The flights are finely choreographed and swordplay is raw and relentless as limbs are hacked off.

The latter part of the film slows down, building tension in the seemingly safe village, Smith’s develops the eerie strangeness of the rural superbly, reminiscent of the Wickerman (1973 & 2006), In the Name of the Rose (1986) and The Village (2004).

Although in fear of being typecast as another chain armoured soldier Bean gives a passionate and gripping performance, and newcomer Redmayne plays the confounded monk Osmund’s admirably. The supporting cast, even though another band mercenaries are memorable and the characters are developed. Comedy actor Tim McInnerny is satisfactory in an unusual serious role as the village head. There’s a notable cameo by David Warner as The Abbot. However, it’s Carice van Houten who steals the show as Langiva the striking necromancer.

There’s a little too much shaky hand held camera work at times, that aside the cinematography is first rate. Dario Poloni screenplay is the icing on the cake, as the dialogue feels authentic and unforced, compared to the aforementioned other period piece. It explores religious beliefs, faith, witch hunts, occultism and much more.

With low expectation’s for another period piece, I was pleasantly surprised by Smith’s vision. Certainly not perfect or the grandest film; however, it’s a gripping medieval, satanic mystery action that has a nice original twist at the end.

Centurion (2010)


Talented and left of the middle director Neil Marshall returns with a 117 A.D story of a group of Roman soldiers who must fight for their lives as they are hunted down by the Picts the savage, elusive and remorseless inhabitants of Northern Britain.

In the vein of Beowulf & Grendel (2005) 13th Warrior (1999) and of course Gladiator (2000), Centurion oddly missed a long running large screen release. It has an excellent diverse cast ensemble, including Olga Kurylenko, Imogene Poots, David Morrissey and the great Liam Cunningham. With excellent make-up design, costumes and fantastic breathtaking settings, it’s only hankered by some strained dialogue which lacks the conviction of that in the Black Death (2010).

Centurion is modest constructed period piece, there’s Etain (Kurylenko) and Michael Fassbender’s excellent performance as Quintus, violence, blood and decapitations. Supporting actors are the backbone with the likes of Axelle Carolyn and Dave Legeno to name a few but they are not given enough to do or say. You can forgive at times Ilan Eshkeri great, yet, at times intrusive theatrical score, as Marshall delivers some great set ups, action, the wolf hunt and ambush to name a few and Centurion grips you and creates tension like his unsurpassed earlier work.

There’s lots of atmosphere created by the location shoot and visually Marshall delivers. Blood and gore lovers will eat this up.






Well there we have it, what did you think?

One of the greatest action adventurers ever! Dr. Henry “Indiana” Jones, Jr. a character created by Starwars director George Lucas as a homage to the action heroes of 1930s film serials. Indy first appeared in the Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), and was amazingly played by Harrison Ford. Since then he’s portayed him in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), and Indiana Jones and Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) all of which directed by Steven Spielberg.

There’s something cool and fascinating about character, the bullwhip, the Fedora and leather jacket. His sense of humour, deep knowledge of ancient civilisations and languages. But his flaws are interesting too, his fear of snakes, commitment and so on.

Indiana Jones remains one of cinema’s most revered movie characters and made Harrison a worldwide star. You could say the character has become bigger than the films themselves. Although the above is nothing new to fans, I hope it’ll draw those in who haven’t seen these films. Below are my thoughts on Indiana’s feature film adventures to date.

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)

Archaeologist and adventurer, Indiana Jones must find the Ark of the Convent before Hitler’s Army can use its powers to destroy their enemies.

George Lucas’ story is extraordinary (now) set between Temple and Last Crusade, Raiders is a fantastic piece of cinema, a perfect mix of action, adventure and humour, wonderfully directed by Steven Spielberg. It’s perfectly written by Lawrence Kasdan.

Shot on many locations and painstakingly created sets it has a grittiness and ground feel that adds to the believability. The cast are also excellent and John Williams infamous theme is used a just the right times and the score is very stirring. Harrison Ford is ideal as whip cracking, hat donned, fist fighting, Indiana Jones who is aided on his adventure by feisty ex-girl friend Marion Ravenwood play by Karen Allen. The cast include John Rhys-Davies, Denholm Elliott, Alfred Molina and Paul Freeman gives a memorable performance as Dr. René Belloq.

It has an abundance of great characters and scenes, notably the opening where Indie must flee with an idol, the truck chase, a fight around a moving plane and navigating his way through a room full of snakes.

It’s a true adventure film that has been often imitated but never surpassed. A must see.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)

After a diamond exchange goes awry and a plane crash-lands in India, Indiana Jones decides to help a fraught village to find it’s stolen children and mystical stones.

With dated effects and a problematic shoot, Harrison injured his back much of the action was undertaken by veteran stuntman Vic Armstrong, it’s still an adequate Indy adventure.

Clearly mostly filmed on sound stages it lacks the gritiness of Raiders of the Lost Ark. Characters like Sallah, Ravenwood and Brody are sorely missed and the viewer is quickly forced to fall in love with the new leads, Kate Capshaw and Jonathan Ke Quan. Quan is good fun but the film looses it’s edge due to the Goonies actors round house kicks and wise cracks. That said, some of the dialogue shindigs between him and Indy are quite well executed. Capshaw is fine when she’s not screaming but is very theatrical.

Harrison Ford is again excellent as Indiana Jones and although set before Raiders appears less intelligent when donning the hat and whip, an almost reverse Superman Clark Kent character issues due to Willard Huyck & Gloria Katz screenplay.

George Lucas story is decent and incorrectly slated for being dark, but Raiders was and equally dark, brawls, shootouts, ghosts, Nazis’ and a poisoned monkey to same a few. If anything there’s too much comedy in Temple. However, when Indy is serious, in conversation to the villagers, playing politics, cultural differences and fighting Mola Ram (Amrish Puri) guards it’s good sincere fun.

Unfortunalty, the script is so unbalanced it doesn’t surpass or equal its predecessor, falling short of a classic adventure. That said, the costumes and stunt are great. With John Williams legendary score, an amazing musical number to open the film and some fantastic set pieces Temple of Doom is enjoyable enough.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)

Dumping the set-like feel of Temple of Doom and going for location shoot of Raiders Steven Spielberg’s vision looks fantastic. There’s no denying that some of the effects have dated and Jeffrey Boam’s script a little heavy on the comedy, but George Lucas and Menno Meyjes story is exciting and intricate. In this quest Indiana Jones must rescue his kidnapped father and stop the Nazis that are in search of the Holy Grail.

Although a little forced the cute flash back opening has exciting gusto as you see the influences on young Indy (played by River Phoenix) that turned him into Indiana the man.

The casting is note worthy, Alison Doody as Dr. Elsa Schneider is wonderful, playing the perfect Austrian (even though she’s Irish). Harrison Ford is once again flawless in the title role, a part that he was made for. Sean Connery is exceptional as Indy’s father and familiar faces return including John Rhys-Davies’ Sallah and Denholm Elliott’s Marcus Brody. My only complaint is that Brody’s character is far more comical than he comes across in the first adventure.

With John Williams familiar fantastic score, coupled with globe trotting adventure and action set pieces galore, Last Crusade is an exciting must see classic.

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)

As a fan it’s a mixed bag, to anyone one else a fantastic piece of entertainment.

The downside of the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is that it has the set type feel of the second film, as oppose to the location feel of the first and third Indy adventure. John Hurt is wasted as the gibbering wreck Professor Oxley and Ray Winstone although humorous is given a clichéd stereotype side kick role. Karen Allen again plays Marion Ravenwood but doesn’t get enough to do. Also there’s not enough meaty dialogue too fill in-between the action sequences that are bogged down with CGI.

The good stuff – Despite Cate Blanchett’s ever changing Russian accent as Irina Spalko she gives a great physical performance. Even though Mr Ford has aged, the story accommodates the 19 year gap since the last film. Shia LaBeouf as Mutt Williams is surprisingly great and has the charisma to carry the series into new adventures. John Williams score is flawless as usual and Fords performance as an aged adventurer continues to capture the imagination.

Overall, even with over cooked ending, written by George Lucas (story), is balanced by the great performance of Harrison Ford, as Indiana Jones, under Steven Spielbergs direction. Get the hat and whip ready – hopefully there’ll be another adventure soon!

I’ve put this blog post together to save you the anguish and time of sitting down and watching these ‘horror’ offerings. Not only that, to also remind you not to revisit these, if you are slightly tempted, contemplating I’ll give them another try they weren’t that bad. Trust me they don’t get better with repeat viewing. Don’t let the stills and posters tempt you.

Don’t get me wrong I’m no horror snob, it’s not all the Shining and Alien for me. I like Puppet Master and Blood Dolls and these nasty three are in no way the worst film ever to grace celluloid out there, but they are not the finest either. For me they were films that wasted the time, talent and budget, when that energy, or lack of it, could have been better spent.
Sadly, these nauseating presentations gave me painful burning sensation in my right thigh and here’s my brief thoughts on why…

The Descent: Part 2 (2009)Even after the UK ending of The Descent, Sarah still manages to get out but is forced back to the uncharted underground to help locate her five missing companions. I’ll try not reminisce over the amazing first film, there seem to be some mixed comments on The Decent: Part 2. If you did like The Descent, for the record the follow up is a huge disappointment.Surprisingly the excellent editor Jon Harris gives a poor directorial debut. Even with some of the strong original cast including Shauna Macdonald and Natalie Mendoza, they simply can’t save J Blakeson and James McCarthy poor screenplay. On board is Eden Lake’s writer James Watkins and support from cinematographer Sam McCurdy (The Descent, Dog Soldiers, Doomsday to name a few).

It’s a poor man interpretation of the Descent, it not a straight to video production but its almost there, awful dialogue, little if any character development, no suspense and poorly executed scares, that’s just touching the surface.The film looks rushed, the lighting, sets, sound, direction, everything on screen looks cheap and nasty. It lacks the grittiness of the first and the Crawler’s don’t look as menacing or a realistic.

It shows how a film with such great talent can go so wrong.

Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977)

Set four years after The Exorcist Regan MacNeil is still recovering from her previous demonic possession, but the evil may only be repressed. A priest and Exorcist is tasked with investigating his late teachers death.

As a stand alone film or sequel it’s shocking and for all the wrong reasons. Maybe with another script the fantastic actors, Richard Burton and James Earl Jones to name a few wouldn’t have been wasted. The music score by Ennio Morricone, dreamlike atmosphere and some effects are the films redeeming features.

With fancy locations, sets and lighting Boorman’s direction is fine (who brought us the excellent Excalibur (1981)), but it seems the failing is in the script. It never seems to flow. Not even a good performance from Burton can save it nor another edit as it delves into unsatisfactory trance driven telepathic melodrama  – sadly it is pale in comparison to it predecessor.

Watch it if only for curiosity or Burton’s and Blair’s performance. As Burton’s Father Lamont states, “It was horrible, utterly horrible… and fascinating!”

Zombie Strippers! (2008)

Jenna Jameson and horror icon Nightmare on Elm Street’s Robert Englund, star in Zombie Strippers! I’m a B horror fan and was really looking forward to this one, of course I was never expecting Oscar material. The positive, there is a good looking cast (some of who can act) the poster for the film is true Classic B horror style, great, thumbs up. The effects are outstanding (could be where the budget went?)some are very effective and hyper realistic. Unfortunately that’s it sorry folks.

I don’t think Zombie Strippers will ever have that ‘cult’ status. However, I am sure it’ll have a fan base following by gore lovers, Jameson lovers and bust lovers.

Zombie strippers is not charming enough to be a Charles Band or Roger Corman B film and there really is nothing funny about zombie herpes, although I’m sure it looked hysterical to writer/Director Jay Lee when it was written.

Even with its Anti American Bush administration under tones and jibes at the superficial, the film just isn’t clever enough to make a any serious subtle points. There’s a little spoof to Resident Evil in there and other nods to zombie films but it’s not really a ‘meet the Spartans’ spoof either.

It suffers from the that ‘TV look’, and is less entertaining than an episode of the A-team, season 2, episode 3. Oh did I mention there were boobs in it and decomposing strippers too?

What I’m trying to say is re-watch Show Girls and an Evil Dead, or a Living Dead film back to back, it’s far more rewarding and fun!